Not the party of JFK

May 10, 2013 

When I think of the Democratic Party, I think back to when John F. Kennedy was president. He was a true American who believed in American exceptionalism. He projected a vision that seemed to inspire the American people.

Since his death the Democratic Party seems to have slowly evolved into the present-day Progressive Party. Their ideology has been around since our country was established. It was rejected by our forefathers in favor of our Constitution and our Bill of Rights.

A progressive form of government is based on a very large central government run by an alleged highly educated elite group of politicians. Basically they control the citizens through mandated rules and regulations in the name of social justice and redistribution of the wealth. Level the playing field, so to speak.

To accomplish this, the government must be dictatorial with lots of checks and balances to ensure the citizens are in compliance with the goals of the state. Political correctness is paramount and exceptionalism is not encouraged.

This form of government is based on socialistic ideology not unlike the old Soviet Union, China, Nazi Germany and several others.

The current administration seems to be following the progressive blueprint and never misses a chance to apologize for the United States' behavior worldwide. I would suggest they read our history and recognize the sacrifices of 104,366 brave Americans in cemeteries around the world who gave their lives so the people of the world could be free of dictators and demigods.

William D. Coulson

Marissa

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