And to the republic ...

September 10, 2013 

We are not a democracy as it may seem today; nowhere in our founding documents does it say such. We are a constitutional republic, a huge difference.

A democracy is rule by a omnipotent majority; the Founding Fathers viewed it as mob rule. The individual, and any group of individuals in the minority, have no protection against the unlimited power of the majority under a democracy. This is true whether it be a direct democracy or a representative democracy. In both cases, the majority's power is absolute and unlimited; its decisions cannot be appealed under the legal system established, opening the door to unlimited tyranny by the majority.

Benjamin Franklin wrote in his "Poor Richard's Almanak" that, "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote. The framers condemned the excesses of democracy and abuses under any democracy of the unalienable rights of the individual by the majority.

A republic's purpose is to control the majority strictly, primarily to protect the individual's God-given, unalienable rights and therefore for the protection of the rights of the minority, of all minorities, and the liberties of people in general. Limited government is also a major aspect of a republic; then the government is handcuffed from dominating our lives.

The disease, liberalism, set upon this nation will be eradicated but it will take time. A constitutional reformation, back toward the founding principles, is where it starts.

Russell C. Fette

Collinsville

Belleville News-Democrat is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere in the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

Commenting FAQs | Terms of Service