Rival GMs ought to try a career in stand-up comedy

Posted on November 13, 2013 

I wrote last year that I feared the St. Louis Cardinals were cursed by the fact that they have so many talented young players in that it's causing them not to be able to make a reasonable deal.

Nothing has happened to change my concern that the Redbirds are victims of talent gridlock.

CBS reports that the Baltimore Orioles had the audacity to call the Cardinals and ask for 15-game winner and bronze medal winning in the rookie of the year balloting Shelby Miller in exchange for shortstop J.J. Hardy.

Hardy hit .263 with 25 homers and 76 RBIs last year. But he's 31 years old and a free agent after the 2014 season.

So the Redbirds are supposed to give up several years of cheap service from a top of the rotation starting pitcher in exchange for renting a shortstop for one year? What's not to love about that proposal?

The Cardinals have lot of players who would be attractive to other teams if there weren't a couple of beauty queens in the room stealing their attention.

Nobody wants to talk about Seth Maness, John Gast or Sam Freeman, however, because they think they're going to land Miller, Michael Wacha, Trevor Rosenthal and Oscar Taveras for a 35-year-old fifth outfielder.

I'm sure the Cardinals front office staff wants the same thing fans want: a quick resolution to the shortstop issue so we can all set our minds on the important business of fantasizing about the 2014 season. But it looks as if that's unlikely to happen because the Redbirds are going to have to wait around for the price to come down on trade quarry or a potential free agent addition.

Still, I say again: I'd rather see the Cardinals report to spring training with Pete Kozma as shortstop than to see the club get robbed blind trying to improve in one position.

 

 

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