From cupcakes to ticket quotas, lawmakers were busy this spring

News-DemocratJune 14, 2014 

Chloe Stirling hands out cupcakes to Governor Pat Quinn, Rep. Charlie Meier, Sen. James Clayborne, Sen. Bill Haine, Sen. Kyle McCarter and Troy Mayor Al Adomite after the Gov. Quinn signed the "cupcake bill" in the kitchen where it all began.

DERIK HOLTMANN — dholtmann@bnd.com Buy Photo

Puppy sales, pregnant women, bumper pads in cribs, traffic tickets, marijuana for epilepsy, boater education requirements, Google Glass, drones, microbeads, storm shelters, farmers markets, poker runs, voter registration, psychologists, bullies, interns and cupcakes.

They maybe didn’t get the job done on the big issues of taxes and spending, but Illinois legislators nonetheless had a busy spring session, addressing those issues and more. In fact, they were so busy, they barely had enough time to give themselves a raise.

Gov. Pat Quinn said legislators “didn’t get the job done” regarding the state’s shaky financial situation. Lawmakers essentially punted, passing a $35.7 billion, “maintenance” spending plan for the fiscal year beginning July 1 that keeps most funding flat.

Democratic leaders had attempted to make permanent the state’s temporary income tax increase — which this year is costing the typical taxpayer about $1,100 — but they couldn’t round up enough votes. They’ll likely try again in the fall — after the November election.

Proponents of the tax increase say the alternative is cutting at least $4.4 billion in spending by reducing programs, closing facilities and laying off state workers.

Whether lawmakers gave themselves a raise is a matter of semantics. The past few years, they’ve voted to give themselves unpaid furloughs, but no furloughs are included in the budget for the upcoming fiscal year.

Legislators’ base salary will therefore increase $3,118, restoring their base salary to $67,826. Lawmakers also earn extra for committee assignments, making the average legislator pay roughly $75,000 annually.

Here's a look at some of the bills and issues addressed by the Legislature during the spring session:

SIGN-AND-DRIVE

Bill: SB2583

About the bill: Would allow motorists to simply sign the ticket instead of having to surrender their driver's license if they receive a traffic citation. Current law calls for the police officer to take the motorist's license, which is then returned when the ticket is resolved.

Supporters say a driver's license is the only form of identification for many people, and is often required for making purchases and traveling. The so-called sign-and-drive option would not be allowed in drunken-driving cases.

How they voted:

Sen. James Clayborne, D-East St. Louis -- Yes

Sen. Bill Haine, D-Alton -- Yes

Sen. Dave Luechtefeld, R-Okawville -- Yes

Sen. Kyle McCarter, R-Lebanon -- Yes

Rep. Dan Beiser, D-Alton -- Yes

Rep. John Cavaletto, R-Salem -- Yes

Rep. Jerry Costello II, D-Smithton -- Yes

Rep. Jay Hoffman, D-Swansea -- Yes

Rep. Eddie Lee Jackson, D-East St. Louis -- Yes

Rep. Dwight Kay, R-Glen Carbon -- Yes

Rep. Charlie Meier, R-Okawville -- Yes

CRIB BUMPER PADS

Bill: HB5348

About the bill: The bill would have outlawed the sale or manufacture of bumper pads for baby cribs. Supporters say the pads can strangle or trap a baby. Opponents said the pads can prevent babies' limbs from getting trapped in crib openings, and that the research is inconclusive.

There was no official vote in the Senate. The Senate sponsor pulled the bill when a vote tally indicated it wouldn't pass.

How they voted:

Beiser -- No

Cavaletto -- No

Costello -- Yes

Hoffman -- Yes

Jackson -- Yes

Kay -- No

Meier -- No

Status: Passed 64-46 in House; no official vote in Senate.

PREGNANCY ACCOMMODATIONS

Bill: HB0008

About the bill: Makes it a civil rights violation for an employer not to provide "reasonable accommodations" to women for pregnancy and childbirth. Also makes it a human rights violation to force an employee to accept accommodations related to pregnancy.

The definition of "reasonable accommodations" includes lighter physical workload, more frequent and longer breaks, private non-bathroom space for expressing breast milk or breastfeeding, acquisition or modification of equipment, time off to recover from childbirth, a part-time or modified work schedule, and leave.

Employers would not be required to provide accommodations that create an "undue hardship" on the employer.

How they voted:

Clayborne -- Yes

Haine -- Yes

Luechtefeld -- Yes

McCarter -- Yes

Beiser -- Yes

Cavaletto -- Yes

Costello -- Yes

Hoffman -- Yes

Jackson -- Yes

Kay -- Yes

Meier -- Yes

Status: Passed Senate 57-0; passed House 65-36. Goes to governor.

JUVENILE ARREST RECORDS

Bill: SB978

About the bill: Would erase arrest records for juveniles who do not end up being charged or convicted. Would require Illinois State Police to annually delete arrest records for those minors. Would exclude sex-related offenses and higher-level felonies, as well as those that happened within the previous six months.

How they voted:

Clayborne -- Yes

Haine -- Yes

Luechtefeld -- No

McCarter -- No

Beiser -- Yes

Cavaletto -- No

Costello -- No

Hoffman -- Yes

Jackson -- Yes

Kay -- No

Meier -- No

Status: Passed Senate 41-13, passed House 74-40. Signed by governor.

SCHOOL STORM SHELTERS

Bill: HB2513

About the bill: Requires new schools to include a storm shelter.

How they voted:

Clayborne -- Yes

Haine -- Yes

Luechtefeld -- No

McCarter -- No

Beiser -- Yes

Cavaletto -- Yes

Costello -- Yes

Hoffman -- Yes

Jackson -- Yes

Kay -- Yes

Meier -- Yes

Status: Passed Senate 43-14, passed House 103-0. Goes to governor.

PET STORE PUPPIES

Bill: HB4056

About the bill: An early version of the legislation would have banned pet stores from selling dogs and cats from breeders, and would instead have allowed them to sell only animals that came from shelters. Supporters of that version, including Gov. Pat Quinn, argued it would help shelter animals find homes, and put "puppy mills" out of business.

Pet stores argued they'd be the ones put out of business if they couldn't sell dogs and cats obtained from breeders. So the bill was revised, allowing pet stores to continue selling animals obtained from breeders, but only if the breeders are licensed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and have not been cited by the USDA for serious violations.

Neither version of the bill received a full vote.

BOATER EDUCATION MANDATE

Bill: SB3433

About the bill: Beginning in 2016, will require people born on or after Jan. 1, 1998, to obtain a boating safety certificate in order to operate a boat on an Illinois lake. Businesses that rent boats to individuals would be required to provide an abbreviated course to renters.

An early version of the bill would have put the requirement on anyone born on or after Jan. 1, 1991, but that version lacked support. A person born Jan. 1, 1991, is currently 23.

How they voted:

Clayborne -- Yes

Haine -- Yes

Luechtefeld -- Yes

McCarter -- Didn't vote

Beiser -- No

Cavaletto -- No

Costello -- No

Hoffman -- No

Jackson -- Yes

Kay -- No

Meier -- No

Status: Passed Senate 54-0, passed House 71-42. Goes to governor.

BOATING UNDER INFLUENCE

Bill: SB3434

About the bill: Allows for the seizure and forfeiture of a watercraft if a person operates the watercraft while under the influence of alcohol or drugs, and the person's watercraft-operating privileges were already suspended or revoked for operating a watercraft while under the influence, or if the person had already been convicted of operating a watercraft under the influence in a crash that killed or seriously injured another.

How they voted:

Clayborne -- Yes

Haine -- Yes

Luechtefeld -- Yes

McCarter -- No

Beiser -- No

Cavaletto -- No

Costello -- Yes

Hoffman -- Yes

Jackson -- Yes

Kay -- No

Meier -- Yes

Status: Passed Senate 52-2, passed House 85-27. Goes to governor.

GOOGLE GLASS DRIVING

Bill: SB2632

About the bill: Would outlaw wearing a "mobile computing headset" -- such as Google Glass -- while driving. Google Glass is a minicomputer, built into the frames of eyeglasses. Lawmakers in some states worry the devices could result in distracted driving.

After the bill was filed, Google sent representatives to Springfield to show how the devices work. Some studies suggest the devices might actually be less distracting than smartphones and might help drivers avoid hazards.

Status: The bill never made it out of committee.

JOB APPLICANT CRIMINAL RECORDS

Bill: HB5701

About the bill: With a few exceptions, would prohibit employers from asking on initial job applications if a person has a criminal record. Employers would be allowed to inquire about criminal records only after the applicant has been deemed qualified for the position and offered an interview.

How they voted:

Clayborne -- Yes

Haine -- Yes

Luechtefeld -- Yes

McCarter -- No

Beiser -- Yes

Cavaletto -- No

Costello -- No

Hoffman -- Yes

Jackson -- Yes

Kay -- No

Meier -- No

Status: Passed Senate 40-12, passed House 67-47. Goes to governor.

DISPATCHING TRAPPED ANIMALS

Bill: HB5514

About the bill: Allows the use of a .22-caliber rifle or smaller-caliber weapon to dispatch and remove trapped beavers, otters, weasels, minks and muskrats.

How they voted:

Clayborne -- Yes

Haine -- Yes

Luechtefeld -- Yes

McCarter -- Yes

Beiser -- Yes

Cavaletto -- Yes

Costello -- Yes

Hoffman -- Yes

Jackson -- Yes

Kay -- Yes

Meier -- Yes

Status: Passed Senate 57-0, passed House 112-0. Goes to governor.

FARMERS' MARKET REGULATIONS

Bill: HB5657

About the bill: Prohibits local governments from creating regulations for farmers markets that are more strict than state regulations. Gives the state Department of Public Health authority to set up regulations on food sold at the markets.

How they voted:

Clayborne -- Yes

Haine -- Yes

Luechtefeld -- Yes

McCarter -- Yes

Beiser -- Yes

Cavaletto -- Yes

Costello -- Yes

Hoffman -- Yes

Jackson -- Yes

Kay -- Yes

Meier -- Yes

Status: Passed Senate 58-0, passed House 114-0. Goes to governor.

SCHOOL BULLYING

Bill: HB5707

About the bill: Requires schools to have an anti-bullying policy, to investigate complaints of bullying and compile an annual report of bullying cases.

How they voted:

Clayborne -- Yes

Haine -- Didn't vote

Luechtefeld -- No

McCarter -- No

Beiser -- Yes

Cavaletto -- No

Costello -- No

Hoffman -- Yes

Jackson -- Yes

Kay -- No

Meier -- No

Status: Passed Senate 37-18, passed House 75-40. Goes to governor.

SCHOOL CYBERBULLYING

Bill: HB4207

About the bill: Prohibits cyberbullying of school students, even if conducted via a computer or device that is not related to the school, if the bullying "causes a substantial disruption to the educational process or orderly operation of the school."

How they voted:

Clayborne -- Yes

Haine -- Didn't vote

Luechtefeld -- No

McCarter -- No

Beiser -- Yes

Cavaletto -- No

Costello -- Yes

Hoffman -- Yes

Jackson -- Yes

Kay -- No

Meier -- Yes

Status: Passed Senate 32-18, passed House 85-21. Goes to governor.

MICROBEADS BAN

Bill: SB2727

About the bill: Outlaws the sale, or manufacturing for sale, of microbeads in cosmetic products. Proponents of the measure say the tiny, plastic beads -- about the size of a grain of salt -- make their way into water sources, absorb toxins and can end up in the food chain. The beads are used as abrasives in toothpaste, soaps, bath lotions and facial cleansers.

How they voted:

Clayborne -- Yes

Haine -- Yes

Luechtefeld -- Yes

McCarter -- Yes

Beiser -- Yes

Cavaletto -- Yes

Costello -- Yes

Hoffman -- Yes

Jackson -- Yes

Kay -- Yes

Meier -- Yes

Status: Passed Senate 55-0, passed House 116-0. Signed by governor.

NO DRONES WITHOUT WARRANT

Bill: SB2937

About the bill: Would require police to get a warrant from a judge in order to use an aerial drone to conduct an investigation. A warrant would not be required to use the devices during the handling of a natural disaster or public health emergency.

How they voted:

Clayborne -- Yes

Haine -- Didn't vote

Luechtefeld -- Yes

McCarter -- Yes

Beiser -- Yes

Cavaletto -- Yes

Costello -- Yes

Hoffman -- Yes

Jackson -- Yes

Kay -- Yes

Meier -- Yes

Status: Passed Senate 55-0, passed House 103-0. Goes to governor.

PSYCHOLOGISTS PRESCRIBING

Bill: SB2187

About the bill: Gives psychologists limited authority to prescribe medicine. Under current law, prescriptions can be written by psychiatrists, who are medical doctors, but not psychologists, who are not medical doctors.

Restrictions on psychologists would include not being allowed to prescribe certain narcotics, not being allowed to issue prescriptions for people younger than 17 or older than 65, and not being allowed to issue prescriptions for serious medical conditions such as heart disease or cancer.

How they voted:

Clayborne -- Yes

Haine -- Yes

Luechtefeld -- Yes

McCarter -- Yes

Beiser -- Yes

Cavaletto -- No

Costello -- Yes

Hoffman -- Yes

Jackson -- Yes

Kay -- No

Meier -- Yes

Status: Passed Senate 57-0, passed House 94-21. Goes to governor.

TICKET QUOTAS

Bill: SB3411

About the bill: Prohibits police agencies from requiring officers to write a certain number of traffic tickets within a specified time frame. Also prohibits agencies from evaluating officers based on the number of citations they issue.

The bill does not, however, prohibit police agencies from requiring officers to have a specified number of "contacts" with people -- arrests, stops and other interactions.

How they voted:

Clayborne -- Yes

Haine -- Yes

Luechtefeld -- Yes

McCarter -- Yes

Beiser -- Yes

Cavaletto -- Yes

Costello -- Yes

Hoffman -- Yes

Jackson -- Yes

Kay -- Yes

Meier -- Yes

Status: Passed Senate 57-1, passed House 106-9. Goes to governor.

IHSA HEARINGS

Resolution: HR0895

About the resolution: Urged the House's Committee on Elementary and Secondary Education to hold hearings regarding the operation of the Illinois High School Association, an organization that sanctions high school extracurricular activities. Some lawmakers question the organization's sponsorship deals, and its administrative salaries.

The committee heard testimony at one hearing in May. Its chairwoman, Rep. Linda Chapa LaVia, D-Aurora, said she would have additional hearings later.

How they voted:

Beiser -- Yes

Cavaletto -- No

Costello -- Yes

Hoffman -- Yes

Jackson -- Yes

Kay -- No

Meier -- No

Status: Passed House 55-51.

POKER RUNS

Bill: HB4223

About the bill: Puts the regulation of poker runs in the hands of counties, rather than the state. Gives counties the authority to issue licenses for the fundraising events, in which participants travel from one location to another, collecting playing cards to form a poker hand.

The maximum the county can charge for a permit is $25. The state fee has been more than $400.

How they voted:

Clayborne -- Yes

Haine -- Yes

Luechtefeld -- Yes

McCarter -- No

Beiser -- Yes

Cavaletto -- Yes

Costello -- Yes

Hoffman -- Yes

Jackson -- Yes

Kay -- Didn't vote

Meier -- Yes

Status: Passed Senate 53-2, passed House 108-6. Goes to governor.

HUNT/FISH LICENSES FEE

Bill: HB4329

About the bill: Allows Illinoisans older than 75 to get a fishing license or a hunting license for $1. The normal fees are $14.50 for a fishing license and $12 for a hunting license. There already is a half-price discount for people 65 or older.

How they voted:

Clayborne -- Yes

Haine -- Yes

Luechtefeld -- Yes

McCarter -- Yes

Beiser -- Yes

Cavaletto -- Yes

Costello -- Yes

Hoffman -- Yes

Jackson -- Yes

Kay -- Yes

Meier -- Yes

Status: Passed Senate 55-0, passed House 113-0. Goes to governor.

BIRTH CONTROL REFERENDUM

Bill: Puts an advisory referendum on the November ballot, asking whether any health insurance plan in Illinois that provides prescription drug coverage should be required to include prescription birth control as part of that coverage. It will be a nonbinding referendum, meaning it only seeks to measure voters' opinion.

Republicans say the referendum, along with others supported by Democrats, is merely a tactic to increase voter turnout among groups that traditionally have favored Democrats. A state law and a federal law -- the Affordable Care Act -- already mandate prescription coverage for birth control.

How they voted:

Clayborne -- Yes

Haine -- Didn't vote

Luechtefeld -- No

McCarter -- No

Beiser -- No

Cavaletto -- No

Costello -- No

Hoffman -- Yes

Jackson -- Yes

Kay -- No

Meier -- No

Status: Passed Senate 31-18, passed House 62-48. Goes to governor.

MINIMUM WAGE REFERENDUM

Bill: HB3814

About the bill: Sets up holding a nonbinding referendum on the November ballot, asking voters if they think the state's minimum wage should be increased from $8.25 per hour to $10. The referendum is advisory only.

Proponents say an increase would provide workers a decent wage, while opponents say it would force employers to cut their workforce.

How they voted:

Clayborne -- Yes

Haine -- Yes

Luechtefeld -- No

McCarter -- No

Beiser -- Yes

Cavaletto -- No

Costello -- No

Hoffman -- Yes

Jackson -- Yes

Kay -- No

Meier -- No

Status: Passed Senate 39-17, passed House 71-43. Goes to governor.

'MILLIONAIRE TAX' REFERENDUM

Bill: HB3816

About the bill: Sets up an advisory referendum on the November ballot, asking voters if they think an extra 3 percent tax should be assessed on any individual's income above $1 million, with the revenue going toward education.

Proponents say the wealthy should have to contribute more. Opponents say it would drive employers out of Illinois, and that the state can't be trusted to devote the revenue to education.

How they voted:

Clayborne -- Yes

Haine -- Didn't vote

Luechtefeld -- No

McCarter -- No

Beiser -- Yes

Cavaletto -- No

Costello -- Yes

Hoffman -- Yes

Jackson -- Yes

Kay -- No

Meier -- No

Status: Passed Senate 33-17, passed House 64-46. Goes to governor.

HOMOSEXUAL THERAPY

Bill: HB5569

About the bill: Would make it illegal for a mental health provider to conduct "conversion therapy" -- trying to change the sexual preference of a gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender person -- on anyone younger than 18.

Proponents argued that a person's sexual orientation is not a disorder that needs treatment, and that such treatment causes depression among youths. Opponents argued the measure is an attempt to make everyone accepting of homosexuality.

How they voted:

Beiser -- No

Cavaletto -- No

Costello -- No

Hoffman -- Yes

Jackson -- No

Kay -- No

Meier -- No

Status: Failed in House 44-51.

PAYROLL CARDS

Bill: HB5622

About the bill: Sets up some regulations on payroll cards, which some employers are using to pay their workers. The cards are similar to debit cards. The legislation limits the fees that can be charged to employees when they use the cards. Attorney General Lisa Madigan said some workers were being charged excessive fees.

The bill also would require an employer to pay a worker via check or direct deposit, if the worker chooses that option over a payroll card.

How they voted:

Clayborne -- Yes

Haine -- Yes

Luechtefeld -- Yes

McCarter -- Yes

Beiser -- Yes

Cavaletto -- Yes

Costello -- Yes

Hoffman -- Yes

Jackson -- Yes

Kay -- No

Meier -- Yes

Status: Passed Senate 57-0, passed House 98-11. Goes to governor.

STUDENT CPR MANDATE

Bill: HB3724

About the bill: Requires high schools to teach students how to administer cardiopulmonary resuscitation and how to use an automated external defibrillator. Students whose parents file a written objection would not be required to undergo the training.

The bill was inspired by the death of a student at St. Charles North High School during a practice for the drill team. She collapsed and died of a heart condition. There was a portable defibrillator nearby, but it wasn't used on her.

Opponents of the legislation argued it amounts to another unfunded mandate on schools.

How they voted:

Clayborne -- Yes

Haine -- Yes

Luechtefeld -- Didn't vote

McCarter -- No

Beiser -- Yes

Cavaletto -- Yes

Costello -- Yes

Hoffman -- Yes

Jackson -- Yes

Kay -- No

Meier -- Yes

Status: Passed Senate 48-4, passed House 100-12. Signed by governor.

OBAMA LIBRARY

Bill: HB6010

About the bill: Would offer $100 million in state tax dollars to lure Barack Obama's presidential library to Illinois. House Speaker Michael Madigan, D-Chicago, and some fellow Democrats pushed the proposal, saying the incentive is needed to compete against rival bids from Hawaii and New York.

The measure faced push-back from members of both parties who questioned whether a state with financial trouble can afford the expenditure.

Status: Both the Senate and House adjourned without calling for a vote on the bill.

MARIJUANA FOR EPILEPSY

Bill: SB2636

About the bill: Would allow minors younger than 18 who suffer from chronic seizures or epilepsy to obtain a medical marijuana card. The original medical marijuana program, approved last year, did not allow minors to obtain a card for any reason, nor did it allow cards for people who have epilepsy.

Research shows that a chemical in cannabis is successful in controlling seizures. Minors would be allowed to use only cannabis-infused products, not the form that is smoked.

How they voted:

Clayborne -- Yes

Haine -- Yes

Luechtefeld -- Yes

McCarter -- No

Beiser -- Yes

Cavaletto -- No

Costello -- Yes

Hoffman -- Yes

Jackson -- Yes

Kay -- No

Meier -- Yes

Status: Passed Senate 54-2, passed House 98-18. Goes to governor.

SCHOOLS AS POLLING PLACE

Bill: HB3199

About the bill: Changes the election code to state that, at schools which serve as polling places on Election Day, the school "is encouraged to close the school or hold a teachers institute on that day with students not in attendance."

The issue has been a subject of debate. If a county election authority chooses a school as a polling place, the school is required by law to make the building available on election day. State law allows a sex offender on school property only for specific purposes, such as attending a conference with his or her child's teacher, or voting in an election.

How they voted:

Clayborne -- Yes

Haine -- Yes

Luechtefeld -- Yes

McCarter -- Yes

Beiser -- Yes

Cavaletto -- No

Costello -- Yes

Hoffman -- Yes

Jackson -- Yes

Kay -- No

Meier -- No

Status: Passed Senate 56-0, passed House 66-45. Goes to governor.

GOVERNMENT RECORD REQUESTS

Bill: HB3796

About the bill: Amends the Freedom of Information Act, giving government bodies more time and leeway in complying with "voluminous requests" for information. An example of a voluminous request would be "more than five different categories of records in a period of more than 20 business days."

How they voted:

Clayborne -- Yes

Haine -- Yes

Luechtefeld -- Yes

McCarter -- Didn't vote

Beiser -- Yes

Cavaletto -- No

Costello -- Yes

Hoffman -- Yes

Jackson -- Yes

Kay -- No

Meier -- No

Status: Passed Senate 49-1, passed House 77-36. Goes to governor.

ELECTION DAY REGISTRATION

Bill: HB0105

About the bill: Amends the election code, on a trial basis, to allow voter registration at polling places on this fall's Election Day, Nov. 4.

It also would remove identification requirements for in-person early voting and allow public universities to serve as locations for Election Day in-person absentee voting.

Also, each of the state's public universities will allow students who are registered, but haven't switched their registration location, to vote on election day.

Republicans argued the measure could lead to more vote fraud, and is an attempt to increase Democratic votes. Studies show that allowing voter registration on election day increases turnout among the poor, minorities and young people.

How they voted:

Clayborne -- Yes

Haine -- Yes

Luechtefeld -- No

McCarter -- No

Beiser -- Yes

Cavaletto -- No

Costello -- Yes

Hoffman -- Yes

Jackson -- Yes

Kay -- No

Meier -- No

Status: Passed Senate 39-17, passed House 64-41. Goes to governor.

GPS TRACKING OF DEFENDANTS

Bill: HB3744

About the bill: Expands the circumstances under which a judge can order that a defendant be placed under GPS monitoring while free on bail, awaiting trial. Previously, GPS monitoring was allowed only when a defendant was charged with violating an order of protection.

Under the bill, GPS monitoring also would be allowed when a person is charged with domestic battery, kidnapping, unlawful restraint, stalking, cyberstalking, harassment by telephone or through electronic communication, or attempted murder of a spouse or intimate partner. A GPS device could be ordered regardless of whether an order of protection had been issued against the defendant.

The bill is a response to the killing of an Antioch woman. Her ex-boyfriend had been charged with aggravated domestic battery with a deadly weapon. After he was charged, she obtained an order of protection against him.

How they voted:

Clayborne -- Yes

Haine -- Yes

Luechtefeld -- Yes

McCarter -- Yes

Beiser -- Yes

Cavaletto -- Yes

Costello -- Yes

Hoffman -- Yes

Jackson -- Yes

Kay -- Yes

Meier -- Yes

Status: Passed Senate 56-0, passed House 115-0. Goes to governor.

FREEDOM FROM GPS TRACKING

Bill: SB2808

About the bill: Requires police to obtain a warrant before using GPS data and other location-tracking devices in a criminal investigation. Also would allow law enforcement to obtain a tracking order -- similar to a search warrant -- if they have probable cause to believe obtaining current or future location information from an individual's electronic device is needed to solve or prevent a crime.

The bill contains exceptions to when a court order is needed, such as responding to a 911 call or locating a missing person who is believed to be in danger.

How they voted:

Clayborne -- Yes

Haine -- Yes

Luechtefeld -- Yes

McCarter -- Yes

Beiser -- Yes

Cavaletto -- Yes

Costello -- Yes

Hoffman -- Yes

Jackson -- Yes

Kay -- Yes

Meier -- Yes

Status: Passed Senate 57-0, passed House 111-0. Goes to governor.

RIDE-SHARING SERVICES

Bill: HB5331

About the bill: Puts regulations on ride-sharing operations, such as Uber, Lyft and Sidecar, which are growing in popularity. The services connect passengers and drivers through smartphone apps. Taxi companies wanted the ride-sharing services to be subject to the same regulations as cabs.

Under the bill, ride-sharing drivers would be required to pass background checks and have commercial liability insurance of at least $350,000. The regulations would be more strict for drivers who work more than 36 hours in two weeks.

How they voted:

Clayborne -- Yes

Haine -- Yes

Luechtefeld -- Yes

McCarter -- No

Beiser -- Yes

Cavaletto -- Yes

Costello -- Yes

Hoffman -- Yes

Jackson -- Yes

Kay -- Yes

Meier -- Yes

Status: Passed Senate 48-7, passed House 100-10. Goes to governor.

DENTISTS GIVE VACCINATIONS

Bill: SB3409

About the bill: Allows dentists to administer flu vaccinations to patients 18 or older. The dentist would be required to undergo state-approved training. Dentists would be allowed to administer the shot only "pursuant to a valid prescription or standing order by a physician licensed to practice medicine."

Last year, dentists tried to get authority to administer the flu vaccine as well as other vaccinations, such as the Human Papillomavirus vaccine, or HPV. That bill failed, so dentists tried again this year with a bill focused only on the flu vaccine.

How they voted:

Clayborne -- Yes

Haine -- Yes

Luechtefeld -- Yes

McCarter -- Yes

Beiser -- Yes

Cavaletto -- Yes

Costello -- Yes

Hoffman -- Yes

Jackson -- Yes

Kay -- Yes

Meier -- Yes

Status: Passed Senate 55-0, passed House 114-1. Goes to governor.

JACKSONVILLE DEVELOPMENTAL CENTER

Bills: HB5481 and HR998

About the bill: The bill, HB5481, would have ordered the Department of Human Services to conduct a six-month study and issue a report on what has happened to residents of the former Jacksonville Developmental Center, a state-run center for adults with developmental disabilities which the state closed in 2012.

The resolution, HR998, urges the governor and DHS to complete a study on the Jacksonville closure, and urges the governor to halt the closing of the state-operated Warren G. Murray Developmental Center in Centralia until the study is completed.

Meier is trying to block the closure of Murray Center. He has questions about the welfare of the 181 former Jacksonville residents, including ones who now reside in group homes that are privately-operated but publicly-financed.

Status: The bill never made it out of a committee, but the resolution was adopted by the State Government Administration Committee.

FIREFIGHTER AGE LIMIT

Bill: HB4741

About the bill: Increases, for military veterans, the maximum age at which a person can apply to become a firefighter. With a few exceptions, people 35 and older cannot apply to become a firefighter in Illinois. The bill would allow military veterans younger than 40 to apply to become a firefighter.

How they voted:

Clayborne -- Yes

Haine -- Yes

Luechtefeld -- Yes

McCarter -- Yes

Beiser -- Yes

Cavaletto -- Yes

Costello -- Yes

Hoffman -- Yes

Jackson -- Yes

Kay -- Yes

Meier -- Yes

Status: Passed Senate 58-0, passed House 110-0. Goes to governor.

FRAUD, WASTE IN GRANTS

Bill: HB3820

About the bill: Aimed at cutting fraud and waste in state grant programs. Would enact stronger rules on the disclosure of conflicts of interest, and create "real-time auditing" of state grants.

Federal prosecutors are investigating Gov. Pat Quinn's Neighborhood Recovery Initiative, a $55 million anti-violence grant program that he launched in September 2010 for Cook County, while locked in a tight race for governor. A state audit found that Chicago aldermen and other politicians decided which agencies should get grant money, instead of a more objective procedure. The audit also found numerous problems with spending and record-keeping.

How they voted:

Beiser -- Yes

Cavaletto -- Yes

Costello -- Yes

Hoffman -- Yes

Jackson -- No

Kay -- Yes

Meier -- Yes

Status: Passed 89-13 in House, but stalled in a Senate committee.

CUPCAKE BILL

Bill: HB5354

About the bill: Prohibits state and county health departments from regulating home-based cooking operations, as long as their monthly sales don't exceed $1,000, and as long as buyers are informed that the items are homemade. The bill, sponsored by Meier, was a response to the Madison County Health Department's shutdown earlier this year of the cupcake-making operation of 12-year-old Chloe Stirling of Troy.

The legislation had more twists than a marble cake, as there were attempts to load the bill up with education, license and fee requirements. A loaded-up version of the bill got called for a vote in the Senate, but failed.

How they voted:

Clayborne -- Yes

Haine -- Yes

Luechtefeld -- Yes

McCarter -- Yes

Beiser -- Yes

Cavaletto -- Yes

Costello -- Yes

Hoffman -- Yes

Jackson -- Yes

Kay -- Yes

Meier -- Yes

Status: Passed Senate 57-0, passed House 106-0. Signed by governor.

WOLVES, COUGARS, BEARS PROTECTED

Bill: SB3049

About the bill: Gives protected status to wolves, bears and cougars. The animals aren't addressed in the current state wildlife code, but are moving into parts of Illinois -- or already have. Would put the three animals on the state's list of protected species, meaning it would be illegal to kill, possess or sell the animals or any parts of the animals.

A landowner or tenant who is on his or her property would be allowed to kill a bear, cougar or wolf if there is a "reasonable expectation that it causes an imminent threat of physical harm or death to a human, livestock, domestic animals or harm to structures or other property on the owner or tenant's land."

Property owners and tenants also could seek a "nuisance permit" that would allow the killing of the animals if they are "causing a threat to an owner or tenant of land or his or her property that is not an immediate threat."

How they voted:

Clayborne -- Yes

Haine -- Yes

Luechtefeld -- Yes

McCarter -- Yes

Beiser -- Yes

Cavaletto -- Yes

Costello -- Yes

Hoffman -- Yes

Jackson -- Yes

Kay -- Yes

Meier -- Yes

Status: Passed Senate 57-0, passed House 116-0. Goes to governor.

SEXUAL HARASSMENT OF INTERNS

Bill: HB4157

About the bill: Amends the state's Human Rights Act to specify that the term "employee" includes unpaid interns, for purposes of the law's prohibitions against sexual harassment.

How they voted:

Clayborne -- Yes

Haine -- Yes

Luechtefeld -- Yes

McCarter -- Yes

Beiser -- Yes

Cavaletto -- Yes

Costello -- Yes

Hoffman -- Yes

Jackson -- Yes

Kay -- Yes

Meier -- Yes

Status: Passed Senate 53-0, passed House 113-0. Goes to governor.

GAMBLING EXPANSION

Bill: SB1739

About the bill: It had two options for expanding gambling in Illinois.

One option would have added five casinos, including one in Chicago, plus slots at horse-racing tracks. There would have been 600 slots at each track in Cook County, and 450 slots at tracks outside Cook County, except for Fairmount. Fairmount was temporarily cut out of the bill, due to disagreement between the track, the Casino Queen and East St. Louis.

The other option would have added only a state-owned casino in Chicago.

The Casino Queen and the city of East St. Louis, which gets about 40 percent of its revenue from the Casino Queen, were worried about losing revenue to slots at Fairmount. There also was disagreement over how to share local taxes from slots at Fairmount.

Status: The bill's sponsor, Rep. Robert Rita, D-Blue Island, said he decided not to call the bill for a vote because of the Fairmount issues and other concerns. He said he'll try to work on the bill again this fall.

CONCUSSION TRAINING FOR COACHES

Bill: HB5431

About the bill: Requires high school sports coaches, assistant coaches and athletic directors to complete online training on how to prevent concussions and how to spot them.

How they voted:

Clayborne -- Yes

Haine -- Yes

Luechtefeld -- Yes

McCarter -- Didn't vote

Beiser -- Yes

Cavaletto -- Yes

Costello -- Yes

Hoffman -- Yes

Jackson -- Yes

Kay -- No

Meier -- Yes

Status: Passed Senate 52-0, passed House 102-11. Goes to governor.

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