Movie News & Reviews

Movie News & Reviews

Q&A with Alfred Molina

Alfred Molina is the kind of "go to" character actor who elevates every project he appears in. The 64-year-old British-born performer, son of working-class Italian and Spanish immigrants, has been much nominated for his work, and his distinctive looks have allowed him to play just about every ethnicity imaginable. After his breakthrough role as Indiana Jones' guide in "Raiders of the Lost Ark," Molina has appeared in a wide variety of films, including "Prick Up Your Ears," "Boogie Nights," "Frida," "Spider-Man 2" and "The Da Vinci Code." In his latest film, "A Family Man," Molina plays an aging, out-of-work engineer desperate to find a new job. Lewis Beale spoke with the funny and charming actor by phone while he was moving into a new house.

Movie News & Reviews

Q&A with Milla Jovovich: She's in on the action

Milla Jovovich was at the forefront of the modern era of women commanding the screen as action stars. This year marks the 20th anniversary of "The Fifth Element," which saw Jovovich leap off the screen as a formidable heroine – a supreme being even – who captivated audiences under the impression they were just coming to see another Bruce Willis vehicle. Her character, Leeloo, is still cosplayed around the world.

Movie News & Reviews

TV on DVD: 'Coronet Blue,' 'Girls'

CORONET BLUE. Complete series. It's one of DVD's holy grails! CBS' cult '67 summer drama of 13 episodes (two of which never aired) starred up-and-comer Frank Converse (later of gritty half-hour "NYPD"). He plays an amnesiac man washed up on a New York pier, without a name or a past. His only clue is his own whispered phrase upon rescue: "coronet blue." Guest stars who cross his bullet-dodging search for himself include Alan Alda, Hal Holbrook, and, in one episode alone, Candice Bergen, David Carradine and Jon Voight. City-shot color prints look surprisingly sharp in this four-disc set, boasting one bonus feature – new interview (beware spoilers) with series creator Larry Cohen ("Branded," "Phone Booth," "It's Alive").

Movie News & Reviews

Movie review: 'Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets,' silly, exuberant sci-fi adventure

Parents need to know that "Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets" is a sci-fi/action movie based on French comics and directed by Luc Besson. There's plenty of fantasy violence, with futuristic guns, shooting, and fighting (but virtually no blood). An alien character is strapped to a chair and questioned (possibly tortured). The main characters eventually kiss, and one spends the movie asking the other to marry him. There's a "red light" district with flirty characters and a woman doing a sexy dance involving a stripper pole. Language includes one possible use of "s--t" (it's partly obscured by noise) and uses of "ass" and "damn." Though the movie is very long and quite silly, it's also bright and dazzling and fun, with messages about courage, teamwork, environmentalism, and helping the less fortunate. And the main female character (Cara Delevingne) constantly challenges her position as the male's sidekick.

Videos

Absolutely Famous: The Movie

Edina and Patsy are still oozing glitz and glamor, living the high life they are accustomed to; shopping, drinking and clubbing their way around London's trendiest hot-spots. Blamed for a major incident at an uber fashionable launch party, they become entangled in a media storm and are relentlessly pursued by the paparazzi. Fleeing penniless to the glamorous playground of the super-rich, the French Riviera, they hatch a plan to make their escape permanent and live the high life forever more!
20th Century Fox
Absolutely Famous: The Movie 2:27

Absolutely Famous: The Movie

Ben-Hur 2:34

Ben-Hur

Finding Dory 2:19

Finding Dory

Kubo and the Two Strings 2:33

Kubo and the Two Strings