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  • Eclipses were a 'time of tension' for indigenous people

    While modern people have the advantage of telescopes and astronomical measurements to predict a coming eclipse, First Nations had no such advantages. The Mississippian people who populated the Native American city of Cahokia thousands of years before European settlers came to the metro-east were known for their attention to astronomy. Bill Iseminger, assistant site manager of Cahokia Mounds Historic Site, discusses indigenous people and eclipses.

While modern people have the advantage of telescopes and astronomical measurements to predict a coming eclipse, First Nations had no such advantages. The Mississippian people who populated the Native American city of Cahokia thousands of years before European settlers came to the metro-east were known for their attention to astronomy. Bill Iseminger, assistant site manager of Cahokia Mounds Historic Site, discusses indigenous people and eclipses. Steve Nagy snagy@bnd.com
While modern people have the advantage of telescopes and astronomical measurements to predict a coming eclipse, First Nations had no such advantages. The Mississippian people who populated the Native American city of Cahokia thousands of years before European settlers came to the metro-east were known for their attention to astronomy. Bill Iseminger, assistant site manager of Cahokia Mounds Historic Site, discusses indigenous people and eclipses. Steve Nagy snagy@bnd.com

Ancient Cahokians may have watched the sun disappear, not knowing it would return

August 11, 2017 09:30 AM

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  • Fire chief talks about helicopter crash

    Fire chief offers details on video after helicopter crash injures two at St. Louis Downtown Airport in Cahokia, IL, near St. Louis, MO.