The first residents of Grizzly Ridge, 350-pound male named Huckleberry and 250-pound female named Finley, made their public debut Thursday morning to St. Louis Zoo members. Grizzly Ridge is located on the site of the Zoo’s historic bear grottos, which closed for construction in late 2015. When the grottos were built in the early 1920s, they were considered cutting-edge, and the Saint Louis Zoo was one of the first zoos in the world to replace barred cages with the open, moated enclosures. The new habitat retains three-fifths of the original rock work, which was cast from Missouri limestone palisades. All new rock work was designed to reflect the historic look. Visitors can view the bears through a total of 22 glass-panel windows, which offer a panoramic view into the bears’ outdoor habitat.
The first residents of Grizzly Ridge, 350-pound male named Huckleberry and 250-pound female named Finley, made their public debut Thursday morning to St. Louis Zoo members. Grizzly Ridge is located on the site of the Zoo’s historic bear grottos, which closed for construction in late 2015. When the grottos were built in the early 1920s, they were considered cutting-edge, and the Saint Louis Zoo was one of the first zoos in the world to replace barred cages with the open, moated enclosures. The new habitat retains three-fifths of the original rock work, which was cast from Missouri limestone palisades. All new rock work was designed to reflect the historic look. Visitors can view the bears through a total of 22 glass-panel windows, which offer a panoramic view into the bears’ outdoor habitat. Derik Holtmann dholtmann@bnd.com
The first residents of Grizzly Ridge, 350-pound male named Huckleberry and 250-pound female named Finley, made their public debut Thursday morning to St. Louis Zoo members. Grizzly Ridge is located on the site of the Zoo’s historic bear grottos, which closed for construction in late 2015. When the grottos were built in the early 1920s, they were considered cutting-edge, and the Saint Louis Zoo was one of the first zoos in the world to replace barred cages with the open, moated enclosures. The new habitat retains three-fifths of the original rock work, which was cast from Missouri limestone palisades. All new rock work was designed to reflect the historic look. Visitors can view the bears through a total of 22 glass-panel windows, which offer a panoramic view into the bears’ outdoor habitat. Derik Holtmann dholtmann@bnd.com

Saint Louis Zoo Association buys union property for $7.1 million

March 09, 2018 10:03 AM