Ellie Hughes, left, helps Ava Griffith-Lercher, fourth-graders in Mrs. Langham’s class at Highland Elementary, save “Fred the Worm.” Also pictured, Maya Pollard works on her own Fred. Saving Fred is an edible team-building STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics)activity with students using the Scientific Method. Fred, a not-so-smart gummy worm, cannot swim. His boat (a plastic cup) has capsized and his life jacket (a gummy lifesaver) is under the boat. Students must work to save Fred using only paper clips.
Ellie Hughes, left, helps Ava Griffith-Lercher, fourth-graders in Mrs. Langham’s class at Highland Elementary, save “Fred the Worm.” Also pictured, Maya Pollard works on her own Fred. Saving Fred is an edible team-building STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics)activity with students using the Scientific Method. Fred, a not-so-smart gummy worm, cannot swim. His boat (a plastic cup) has capsized and his life jacket (a gummy lifesaver) is under the boat. Students must work to save Fred using only paper clips. Courtesy photo
Ellie Hughes, left, helps Ava Griffith-Lercher, fourth-graders in Mrs. Langham’s class at Highland Elementary, save “Fred the Worm.” Also pictured, Maya Pollard works on her own Fred. Saving Fred is an edible team-building STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics)activity with students using the Scientific Method. Fred, a not-so-smart gummy worm, cannot swim. His boat (a plastic cup) has capsized and his life jacket (a gummy lifesaver) is under the boat. Students must work to save Fred using only paper clips. Courtesy photo

Enrollment in Highland School District is down 120 students

August 31, 2015 3:00 AM

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  • Reactions to the 2017 solar eclipse at the Louis Latzer Library

    The Louis Latzer Memorial Public Library, located at 1001 9th St. in Highland held an eclipse viewing party on Aug. 21. Members of the community came to view the event through the special filtered library telescopes. This is the first time in almost 100 years that a total solar eclipse has traveled coast to coast in the United States, and it might be the last one for another century, according to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The eclipse "path of totality" passed through parts of southern Illinois, though Highland was not on the bounds.