Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner speaks to reporters in front of his office at the Illinois State Capitol, Thursday, June 30, 2016, in Springfield. Illinois lawmakers were moved to compromise on a stopgap budget after a year-and-a-half stalemate by a powerful force: a high-stakes November election and a voting public one legislator described as near revolt. Rauner signed legislation Thursday evening to keep state government operating for six months and schools open for another year. The plan allows the politicians to campaign without the threat of shuttered schools. Looking on is Illinois House Minority Leader Jim Durkin, R-Western Springs.
Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner speaks to reporters in front of his office at the Illinois State Capitol, Thursday, June 30, 2016, in Springfield. Illinois lawmakers were moved to compromise on a stopgap budget after a year-and-a-half stalemate by a powerful force: a high-stakes November election and a voting public one legislator described as near revolt. Rauner signed legislation Thursday evening to keep state government operating for six months and schools open for another year. The plan allows the politicians to campaign without the threat of shuttered schools. Looking on is Illinois House Minority Leader Jim Durkin, R-Western Springs. Seth Perlman AP
Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner speaks to reporters in front of his office at the Illinois State Capitol, Thursday, June 30, 2016, in Springfield. Illinois lawmakers were moved to compromise on a stopgap budget after a year-and-a-half stalemate by a powerful force: a high-stakes November election and a voting public one legislator described as near revolt. Rauner signed legislation Thursday evening to keep state government operating for six months and schools open for another year. The plan allows the politicians to campaign without the threat of shuttered schools. Looking on is Illinois House Minority Leader Jim Durkin, R-Western Springs. Seth Perlman AP

Spending plan still is not enough

July 02, 2016 07:00 PM