Metro-East News

Cahokia middle school students skate through STEM event

STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) students from the Cahokia Eighth Grade Academy learn various sciences while at a special rollerskating class at Skate City in East St. Louis on Friday morning. Jacorey Allen, left, and Lanard Harris, both 14, were among those who attended the event.
STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) students from the Cahokia Eighth Grade Academy learn various sciences while at a special rollerskating class at Skate City in East St. Louis on Friday morning. Jacorey Allen, left, and Lanard Harris, both 14, were among those who attended the event. tvizer@bnd.com

Skate City skating rink hosted an event Friday for middle school students from Cahokia that explained the correlation between skating and STEM.

The sixth-, seventh- and eighth-grade students were part of District 187’s Positive Behavior Intervention and Support program.

Carmen Hawkins, the internal coach for the program, was excited to talk about the field trip and the partnering of the district’s STEM program with Skate City.

“I wanted them to come on a field trip where they could learn some exciting things to further peak their interests in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). We spoke to Skate City about the students learning about STEM through skates. It’s working out very well.”

There was high energy in the building and excited faces everywhere. The students were eager to connect what they learned about STEM at school with skates and skating.

There were poster boards with pictures that showed how skates looked when they were invented. Some were surprised to see the very old skates and how they evolved to where they are today with polyurethane wheels and flashing lights.

Patricia Wise, co-owner of Skate City Skating Rink, ramped up the students’ level of excitement as she talked and demonstrated the connection between STEM and skates.

“I learned that there were little back bearings inside of the wheels. They make the wheels move,” said Jeremiah White, 14. “I also learned about friction. It was very exciting. We learned science, engineering, math and technology as we looked at the skate. It was fun.”

“I learned that I could not skate the way I do without the bearings in the wheels or the kind of wheels that are on the skates today,” said Jamodre Brown, 14. “The bearings make the skates roll faster and allow you to turn the corners easily.”

Kacie Bament, an eighth-grade math teacher in District 187, said of the students, “They’re very excited to be here. I am also happy that they are learning in a fun way. It’s important that they learn,” she said.

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