Metro-East News

What did county officials and workers make in 2016? Find out here.

What do public employees make compared to you?

Each year the salaries of public employees such as teachers, police and politicians in southwestern Illinois are collected into a searchable database at BND.com/publicpay. Here is how much in taxes it takes to pay government workers, and how their
Up Next
Each year the salaries of public employees such as teachers, police and politicians in southwestern Illinois are collected into a searchable database at BND.com/publicpay. Here is how much in taxes it takes to pay government workers, and how their

More than 2,200 public salary records for Madison County and St. Clair County employees have been added to the 2017 Public Pay Database.

The database houses salary information for many public employees in local government, dating back to 2011.

In 2016, about 1,000 St. Clair County employees earned a total of $39 million, and about 1,250 Madison County employees earned a total of $49 million, according to records. However, not all of the money for salaries comes from the county; some comes from other sources, including the state.

The top five salaries for 2016 in St. Clair County were:

▪  Brendan Kelly, State’s Attorney, $164,502.00

▪  Michael Cantwell, MidAmerica Airport Director, $146,742.54

▪  Debra Moore, Country Board Administration Director, $146,645.22

▪  Terry Beach, Intergovernmental Grants Department Director, $127,768.26

▪  James Fields, Superintendent of Highways, $122,913.06

In Madison County, the top five salaries were:

▪  Tom Gibbons, State’s Attorney, $166,524.80

▪  Joseph Parente, County Administrator, $153,548.90

▪  John Rekowski, Public Defender, $149,864.00

▪  Frank Miles, Community Development Administrator, $131,872.90

▪  Mark Gvillo, County Highway Engineer, $129,982.40

St. Clair County spent an average of nearly $71,000 on 65 people who worked in the sheriff’s department — one of the largest departments in the county — most of whom were deputies and officers. The county also spent an average of about $53,000 on 78 people who worked in the county jail, most of whom were corrections officers.

In Madison County, however, there were about 108 people who worked in the sheriff’s department, most of whom were deputies and officers. They made about $72,000, while 62 people working at the jail made nearly $57,000. Most of them were also corrections officers.

There were 29 county board officials paid by St. Clair County. They made an average of $15,000.

Other elected officials include:

▪  Richard Watson, Sheriff, $103,523.84

▪  Thomas Holbrook, County Clerk, $102,551.84

▪  Michael Costello, Recorder of Deeds, $102,074.96

▪  Patsy Sprague, County Auditor, $100,646.96

▪  Kahalah Clay, Circuit Clerk, $100,394.96

▪  Mark Kern, County Board Chairman, $98,430.96

▪  Charles Suarez, Treasurer, $97,023.84

▪  Jennifer Gomric-Minton, County Assessor, $96,483.84

▪  Calvin Dye, Sr., Coroner, $52,308.91

▪  James Wilson, Board of Review Member, $45,597.92

▪  Michael Crockett, Board of Review Member, $45,547.92

▪  Claire Prindable, Board of Review Member, $43,088.26

▪  Angela Grossmann-Roewe, Board of Review Member, $19,623.70

▪  Susan Sarfaty, Regional Superintendent of Schools, $5,182.20

In Madison County, there were 38 county board members who made $11,000 on average.

Other elected officials there include:

▪  Thomas Gibbons, State’s Attorney, $166,524.80

▪  Rick Faccin, Auditor, $111,488.00

▪  Amy Meyer, Recorder, $109,990.40

▪  Stephen Nonn, Coroner, $109,990.40

▪  John Lakin, Sheriff, $109,983.52

▪  Kurt Prenzler, County Board Chairman, $105,693.12

▪  Debra Ming-Mendoza, County Clerk, $105,969.12

▪  Robert Daiber, Regional Superintendent off Schools, $10,004.80

▪  Christopher Slusser, Treasurer, $1,555.28

The Public Pay Database contains more than 130,000 public salary records. The data is gathered through Freedom of Information Act requests.

The searchable database gives basic compensation information and does not include retirement or insurance benefits. In addition, some government bodies operate on a fiscal year, while others on a calendar year, so comparisons are not always the same for the exact same time period.

Also, someone’s total take-home pay may be more than their base pay. Some teachers, for example, make extra money by coaching sports teams. On the other hand, some employees who appear to make very little money may not have worked the entire year.

More schools, cities, townships, villages and other layers of government in the metro-east will be added as they become available.

Casey Bischel: 618-239-2655, @CaseyBischel

  Comments