Metro-East News

Dupo mom accused of killing 4-year-old daughter found not guilty by reason of insanity

Dupo mom charged in daughter's murder rants about demon

Mary Lockett, 36, of Dupo, was being transferred to a courtroom when she yelled and cursed at a BND photographer. She's charged with first degree murder in the suffocation death of her 4-year-old daughter, Emily Rose Perrin, who suffered from cyst
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Mary Lockett, 36, of Dupo, was being transferred to a courtroom when she yelled and cursed at a BND photographer. She's charged with first degree murder in the suffocation death of her 4-year-old daughter, Emily Rose Perrin, who suffered from cyst

Just before police were called about the death of her daughter, Mary B. Lockett paced back in forth in her home, saying she was “sending her to Jesus.”

Lockett’s daughter, 4-year-old Emily Rose Perrin, was pronounced dead that day in the hospital in April 2016. Lockett later was charged with first-degree murder.

Now, a year later, St. Clair County Circuit Judge Zina Cruse has found the Dupo woman not guilty by reason of insanity. The judge’s decision was based on an agreed-upon set of facts submitted Thursday by the prosecution and the defense.

According to the statement of facts, Lockett, 38, was laying on top of Emily, cupping her hands around her nose and mouth, when Erik Kirk, who had been living with Lockett and her two young kids at the time, arrived home. Kirk pushed Lockett off Emily and began CPR, then called 911.

When police arrived, they said they heard Lockett saying, “the dark angel has come,” “I’m going to kill anyone who comes through the door” and “the dark angel doesn’t even walk on the ground.”

While being transported to the hospital, Lockett said she “killed Emily” and that Emily was the problem the whole time, according to the statement of facts submitted to the court. Lockett said God told her to kill her daughter.

Emily Perrin

Lockett has been sent to the Illinois Department of Human Services, where she will be evaluated in a secure, inpatient setting within the next 30 days. After that, the court will determine where Lockett should be placed next. She’ll remain in jail until the judge decides.

According to the statement of facts, two psychologists who examined Lockett determined she was legally insane at the time. Daniel Cuneo, one of the psychologists, said Lockett was suffering from bipolar disorder, cannabis use disorder and borderline personality disorder, which impaired her ability to understand the criminality of her actions.

She was acutely psychotic at the time of Emily’s death and wasn’t taking her medication as prescribed, Cuneo said.

When police arrived at the house in April 2016, Emily was unconscious and not breathing. Police opened an investigation, and Lockett later was charged with suffocating Emily.

Emily was described by family as a “vivacious” child, one who loved pretending to be a princess.

She battled cystic fibrosis, which damaged her lungs and digestive system and required daily treatment, but Steve Smith, a longtime family friend, said in 2016 that it didn’t stop her from being a very active child. Emily was the youngest of five children in the family.

The Illinois Department of Children and Family Services had been providing services to the family since June 2015, said spokeswoman Veronica Resa in 2016, after a neglect allegation.

There was never an allegation that Lockett had been violent with her children, Resa said.

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