Metro-East News

Halloween can be dangerous for kids, but not because of the candy

A risky Halloween for your eyes?

Spooky, colorful and weird contact lenses are widely available online. U.S. law requires sellers to get a prescription to sell any contact lenses, including decorative lenses that don't correct the wearer's vision. A correct fit and proper care re
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Spooky, colorful and weird contact lenses are widely available online. U.S. law requires sellers to get a prescription to sell any contact lenses, including decorative lenses that don't correct the wearer's vision. A correct fit and proper care re

The last known poisoning of Halloween candy was in 1974, when Ronald Clark O’Bryan laced his children’s candy with cyanide in order to collect life insurance. His son died, and other children got the candy but did not eat it, according to The Smithsonian Magazine.

There are often reports of needles or pins in candy, some inserted as pranks. This year, tribal police in Wisconsin reported methamphetamine in a child’s candy bag after an event. Police in Pennsylvania and New York are wary of edible marijuana in candy as well.

Lisa Madigan, the Illinois Attorney General, suggests searching the sex offender registry to avoid those homes: http://www.isp.state.il.us/sor/. Madigan said it is illegal for sex offenders who committed a crime against a child to hand out candy. More than 24,700 on the statewide registry of 30,200 committed a crime against a child. There are 475 offenders in St. Clair County, 440 in Madison County, and 16 in Monroe County.

A real danger of Halloween trick-or-treating is getting hit by a car.

According to the National Safety Council, children are more than twice as likely to be hit and killed by a car on Halloween than any other single day of the year.

The Illinois State Police reminds trick-or-treaters:

▪  Cross the street at specified intersections or crosswalks.

▪  Children should also carry flashlights or have reflective clothing.

▪  Go to houses that have porch or outside lights on.

▪  Keep your phones down and your heads up.

Other dangers include tripping over ill-fitting costumes.

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