Metro-East News

Popular west Belleville deli is closed; MedExpress opens in Swansea

Nick & Vito’s Meat & Deli, located at 8201 W. Main St. in Belleville, suddenly closed for business Monday.
Nick & Vito’s Meat & Deli, located at 8201 W. Main St. in Belleville, suddenly closed for business Monday. twall@bnd.com

Nick & Vito’s Meat & Deli at 8201 West Main St. in Belleville has closed.

Doors were locked and signs posted in the windows read “Sorry, we’re closed.” Through a window in the front of the darkened restaurant, you can see rugs rolled up in a cart, coolers and display cases devoid of food and the kitchen dismantled.

It’s not clear why Nick & Vito’s closed. A phone number listed for the deli was disconnected and an email was not returned.

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The metro-east’s newest urgent care center is now open in Swansea.

MedExpress is open at the corner of Illinois 159 and Colleen Drive in a fully renovated, 4,900-square-foot building. There are seven exam rooms, a lab and onsite X-ray machines in the center.

A spokeswoman in April said up to 20 people typically are employed at MedExpress sites between healthcare professionals and customer service staff.

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Think smartphones have overtaken “dumbphones” for good?

Think again.

There’s evidently a huge market for the gray, brickish Nokia phones no one’s used in the United States for a decade: Microsoft has agreed to sell the brand to the Taiwanese manufacturer Foxconn for $350 million.

Dumphones were forecast to sell nearly 600 million units, according to a prediction from 2015. A 350-million-unit-per-year market is predicted as far out as 2019. For perspective, that’s far higher than the number of cars sold annually worldwide. In 2015, a mere 72.4 million vehicles were shipped.

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Last month, Mitsubishi admitted it overstated the fuel economy of some of its models by manipulating data from fuel economy tests.

Now, Suzuki has announced it used the wrong methods to test the fuel economy of cars it sells in Japan.

The Mitsubishi announcement triggered a demand from the Japanese transportation authority to require all automakers there to resubmit fuel economy readings. So far, no other companies have been cited for supplying inaccurate readings.

Volkswagen kicked off the recent spate of fuel economy and emissions data snafus, announcing in late 2015 that some of its models contained software that had been manipulated to show lower levels of harmful emissions than what actually were created.

Tobias Wall: 618-239-2501, @Wall_BND

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