Metro-East News

Metro-east residents not losing their minds — there really was an earthquake

News-Democrat

Kyndra Richards cleans up at White’s Foodliner after an early-morning earthquake in Pawnee, Oka., on Saturday. The United States Geological Survey said a 5.6 magnitude earthquake happened Saturday morning in north-central Oklahoma, on the fringe of an area where regulators had stepped in to limit wastewater disposal. That temblor matches a November 2011 quake in the same region.
Kyndra Richards cleans up at White’s Foodliner after an early-morning earthquake in Pawnee, Oka., on Saturday. The United States Geological Survey said a 5.6 magnitude earthquake happened Saturday morning in north-central Oklahoma, on the fringe of an area where regulators had stepped in to limit wastewater disposal. That temblor matches a November 2011 quake in the same region. AP

Some felt their beds move. Some said windows rattled.

Some said they didn’t notice a thing.

But a lot of metro-east residents felt something. And the news that an earthquake shook the Midwest on Saturday morning gave them a little relief — they knew they weren’t losing their minds.

Here’s a sampling of what some metro-east residents posted on the News-Democrat’s Facebook page:

Rob Massey: At work in Edwardsville, asked people in my office if they felt it, one person yes and the other ran outside before I got “earth” out of mouth.

Julia Brooke: Thank you! Trying to convince my husband all morning this happened.

Aimee-Michelle Hawn Gower: Yup, woke me up here in Collinsville.

Angela Gardner: Yes woke me up here in Belleville.

Leia Hollingsworth Johnson (Belleville): Yep! Woke me up out of a dead sleep.

January Loddeke (Germantown): I thought I was going crazy!!!

Anthony Cooper: I felt it in Swansea... I didn't know what was going on.

Stephanie Goepfert: See I'm not totally off my rocker lol.

Deanne Vernon (Fairview Heights): Woke us up.....rattled the pipes in our basement!

Richard Kristina Melton Lawrence: Felt it in Collinsville lasted about 3 minutes, some knick-knacks shook, felt house moving.

Angela McCurdy Wildermuth: I thought maybe I was going crazy lol.

Rita Rubenstein: I felt something under my chair this morning, about 30 minutes ago, in Wood River. It was a tremor. I'm sure it was a frayed tremor.

Greg Seper: Millstadt Illinois! We felt it.

Roxanne Sauerhage: I felt it too. I am in Sparta Illinois, my whole trailer shook.

Gina Broadwater: I was sitting on my deck in Collinsville and the deck started shaking.

Amanda Geier Stehlik: I felt it, but I seriously thought I imagined it because I was on FB reading posts from my family in Kansas about it.

Susan Hellige (Collinsville): In bed when we felt it, we blamed the dog. Haha

Katrina Birke: I felt it in Red Bud. Blamed it on the dog.

Joshua Berg: Rattled the windows here in Washington County, Illinois.

Sue Bergheger: Felt it in Mascoutah! Thought it was the New Madrid fault. Fracking must be stopped!

Jessica Wongler: I thought something was wrong with my car as I was stopped on my way to work this morning ... but this explains it!!

Marianne Kaemmerer Tellor: I felt it in Glen Carbon this morning! I was sitting outside on my porch and my chair sort of rock back-and-forth for a little bit.

Jamie Green: Felt it in west Belleville... Laying in bed and it wiggled!

Quake zones

Saturday morning was just the latest time metro-east residents have felt the earth move from earthquakes.

On April 18, 2008, metro-east residents were awakened at 4:37 a.m. by an earthquake near Bellmont, which is near the Indiana border.

The U.S. Geological Survey said this quake registered a magnitude of 5.4. It was originally reported to be a 5.2.

This quake was in the Wabash Valley Seismic Zone, which is in southeastern Illinois and southwestern Indiana.

Metro-east residents also reported feeling the earth shake from a 4.6-quake near Evansville, Ind., on June 18, 2002, and on Nov. 9, 1968, from a 5.4-quake in Hamilton County, which is southeast of Mount Vernon. The 1968 earthquake was felt by people in 23 states.

The largest quakes recorded in the region occurred during a series of four significant earthquakes in December 1811 and early 1812 in the New Madrid Seismic Zone, which is centered in the Missouri Bootheel. The U.S. Geological Survey says there were not seismographs in North America at the time and estimates these quakes had a magnitude of 7.0 to 7.5. These represent the largest quakes east of the Rocky Mountains since settlement by Europeans in North America.

  Comments