Highland News Leader

Highland is considering selling part of its main electric transmission line

The main transmission line that feeds electricity to the city of Highland begins at this substation near the intersection of Lockmann and Lebanon roads in rural Collinsville and parallels the CSX railroad tracks nearly 15 miles before it ties into the city's grid at the powerhouse behind the Highland Police Department.
The main transmission line that feeds electricity to the city of Highland begins at this substation near the intersection of Lockmann and Lebanon roads in rural Collinsville and parallels the CSX railroad tracks nearly 15 miles before it ties into the city's grid at the powerhouse behind the Highland Police Department. clibbra@bnd.com

The city of Highland is exploring the possibility of selling part of the main transmission line that supplies electricity to the community.

Highland has owned and operated its own power system going back over a century. The system covers the city, as well as some rural areas surrounding Highland and serves more than 6,000 customers.

The main supply of power into the city's distribution system comes via a 138-kilovolt line that runs from rural Collinsville to the power plant yard behind the Highland Police Department. The lines consists of 176 poles spaced along a route 14.7-mile route and connects an Ameren Illinois transmission line to a 138 kV substation near Lockmann and Lebanon roads, east of Collinsville.

On Feb. 20, after returning from executive session, the Highland City Council approved a resolution authorizing City Manager Mark Latham to execute a memorandum of understanding with Ameren Services Company in regards to the possible sale of a 2.5-mile portion of that line.

City officials would not comment further on the potential sale.

A memorandum is a nonbinding agreement, which is usually the first stage in forming a formal contract.

FFA Week

Mayor Joe Michaelis read a proclamation declaring Feb. 18-24 as Futures Farmers of America Week.

Pool agreement approved

The council approved the renewal of a pool rental agreement between the city and HSHS St. Jospeh’s Hospital in Highland. The agreement allows hospital licensed therapy staff to use the pool for aquatic patient therapy.

The agreement is good for one year. It states the hospital will pay the Korte Recreation Center $2.50 per patient visit. The agreement also provides a specific schedule with areas of the pool and what times they can be used by the hospital.

HCS contract renewed

The council approved Highland Communication Services to renew its contract with Fidelity Solutions. The contract allows HCS the right to purchase Minerva licenses and support for their video encryption and IPTV services.

The contract renewal holds no additional cost for HCS, as the cost for 2018 remained the same as last year.

Zoning errors corrected

The council approved a number of amendments to correct some scrivener's errors in the city's zoning district classifications.

Some time since the city's Zoning Code was last updated, in 2006, multiple amendments to the code were accidentally removed from a sections zoning table, otherwise known as the Zoning Matrix, according to a memo from Scott Hanson, the interim supervisor of Building and Zoning.

Though it was never the city's intention to remove these classifications from the table, it was staff's recommendation for the Combined Planning and Zoning Board and the council to reaffirm the uses to ensure they are correct.

Five categories were added back to their correct spot in the Zoning Matrix. The council also amended the "Heliport-Restricted Landing Area-Medical Use Only" use to be in the Principal Residential Uses area instead of the Principal Non-Residential Uses. The amendment also restored the inadvertent deletion of the whole ALL Accessory Uses section of the table.

The memo also says that when the City Council approved the new Mixed Use (MX) zoning district in March 2017, several land uses were accidentally included in the ordinance that were not reviewed by the combined zoning board during its public hearing on March 1.

To make sure the approval process of the MX district has been properly met, Hanson said another CPZB public hearing was held and the items had to be considered by the council again. During this process, several different land uses were also proposed as appropriate for a MX district.

These 10 new uses were:

  • Dry cleaning/ laundry pickup;
  • Commercial day care facility;
  • Pet care and pet related sales and services;
  • Public services, other than Highland;
  • Non-drive through fast food restaurant;
  • General restaurant;
  • Retail sales and services;
  • Radio, television, film or music studios;
  • Motion picture theater;
  • Performing arts theater.



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