O'Fallon Progress

Shiloh police know how much you’re speeding in neighborhoods

Shiloh Police have a new speed radar unit

Shiloh Police has a new speed radar unit and it's been catching lots of speeders. One local resident likes having it in his neighborhood. Shiloh PD Sgt. Sean Joy gives the unit a test for the O'Fallon Progress.
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Shiloh Police has a new speed radar unit and it's been catching lots of speeders. One local resident likes having it in his neighborhood. Shiloh PD Sgt. Sean Joy gives the unit a test for the O'Fallon Progress.

Statistics from a new portable radar trailer shows that Shiloh residents’ concerns over speeding in some neighborhoods has merit.

“We saw and heard the concern, and the numbers speak for themselves,” said Gary McGill, acting Shiloh police chief.

Data obtained from a Freedom of Information Act request filed by the Progress shows that about one-quarter of vehicles traveling on Archview Drive during a four-day period in early January were speeding, and about half of the traffic monitored in the Greystone Estates subdivision the next week were also going above the speed limit.

From Monday, Jan. 9 to Wednesday, Jan. 12, there were a recorded 2,005 cars on Archview Drive. Of those vehicles, 492 were speeding. The highest speed was 41 mph, the FOIA request information showed.

The trailer deployment was on Greystone Estates, facing the eastbound traffic, which is approaching Green Mount Road, was from the morning of Monday, Jan. 17 to the afternoon of Friday, Jan. 20. Of the 2,755 vehicles documented, 1,274 cars were driving above the speed limit. The worst offender topped out at 50 mph.

The speed limit in both stretches of road is 25 mph.

“If you look at those numbers on Greystone Estates Drive, nearly half of the cars on that road were speeding and one of those was doing 50 miles an hour, in a subdivision,” McGill wrote an email to John Marquart, city administrator; Jim Vernier, mayor; and, Brenda Kern, village clerk. The email was also part of the FOIA information.

The village purchased the radar unit for about $7,000. The idea is behind its deployments is to try and slow people down without having to post an officer. It is equipped with red and blue flashers to indicate to the driver they are in violation of the speed limit. The unit is solar-powered, but also has a battery back-up, so it needs little attention. And, since the unit can record data, it can give police information they need if they wish to change tactics and increase patrols.

McGill said he’s told Shiloh officers that the radar trailer is certified, the same as a standard radar unit that is in a squad car.

“They can stop cars and write tickets based on the speed on the mobile units display,” McGill noted.

George Geiger, who lives in The Manors at Woodfield in Shiloh, off Cedar Wood Trail, where the unit was stationed recently, said he walks his dog multiple times a day and often witnesses excessive speeding.

“Me crossin’ the road with my dog is kinda of a challenge, because they come too fast. They just fly through here,” Geiger said.

Geiger said he appreciates the trailer and hopes it works to keeps people’s speeds down in his neighborhood.

“There’s kids in the neighborhood, and there’s a lot of people walkin’ their dogs and ridin’ their bikes,” he said.

Marquart said the unit will be transported throughout the village by the public works department to locations determined by the police department; it will be stored in the public works department garage.

Robyn L. Kirsch: 618-239-2690, @BND_RobynKirsch

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