Scott Air Force Base News

375th AMW reflects on a year of innovative accomplishments

Staff Sgt. Dasha Ermanova with the 375th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron conducts medical training inside the new KC-135 static trainer.
Staff Sgt. Dasha Ermanova with the 375th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron conducts medical training inside the new KC-135 static trainer.

Throughout the year, the 375th Air Mobility Wing has worked to expand its capabilities in an Air Force operating with less money, personnel, and resources.

To compensate, Airmen have successfully implemented the “Innovation” piece of the “ICE” principles that Col. Laura Lenderman, 375th Air Mobility Wing commander, asks the wing to embody each day, enabling Rapid Global Mobility for the nation.

With 2017 right around the corner, the 375th AMW prepares to work toward another year of meaningful innovations, but it’s also a time to reflect on some its successes.

TRAINING PLATFORMS

The heart of ensuring total mission preparedness in today’s force is in the training, and the first of these innovative training accomplishments is with the implementation of the C-130 and KC-135 aeromedical static trainers.

These static trainers are estimated to save the base $375,000 a year by providing a localized simulation platform that could also be credited toward training that is traditionally accomplished in-flight.

“Before we had these assets, we would work with the flying units around the country so our crew members could maintain currency on various aircraft,” said Lt. Col. Catherine Bonhoff, 375th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron Operations Officer.

Bonhoff said this often resulted in crewmembers being gone for three days to accomplish just a few hours of training and, in combination with operational missions, crewmembers would find themselves on the road for about seven months out of the year. With the addition of these static trainers, however, 50 percent of all clinical training requirements can now be accomplished on Scott AFB.

Ultimately, our wing cannot achieve excellence if we do not innovate … and not one of us can do this alone. We do this together, and we do this by prioritizing our efforts and resources. I’m proud of the 375th AMW team for leading the way and making improvement not just for our wing, but for the Air Force!

Col. Laura Lenderman, 375th Air Mobility Wing Commander

By being an innovative leader among wings, Scott also attracts Total Force AE partners from other states, strengthening relationships between units.

“Reserve aeromedical evacuation units fly in on their grey tails and let us train on their aircraft while they work with our Cargo Compartment Trainer,” said Bonhoff.

“We intend to expand on this practice by incorporating electronic health record training into CCT scenarios. This will be a magnet for AE units that need just-in-time pre-deployment refresher training.”

Another money and time saving training innovation, the Reduced Oxygen Breathing Device, made its debut to Scott in September and serves all the aviators on base.

Over the next six years, the ROBD will save the installation $360,000. Aircrews will no longer travel to the nearest available altitude chamber, which is over 300 miles away. Additionally, the ROBD takes 1/6th of the time that the two-hour altitude training chamber required and offers a more realistic experience as students fly a simulated flight profile. Finally, it allows crews to experience hypoxia without the need for pre-oxygenation or threat of decompression sickness.

WEB APPLICATIONS

In a fast-paced society, the demands for quick communication and instant resources are high. The 375th Communications Support Squadron has developed multiple applications throughout the year to meet these demands.

The development flight, a team of 40 programmers and software engineering managers, fielded three new innovative applications this year: the Attachment Three Assessment Tool, Aeromedical Power System, and the Mobility Guardian Exercise Registration Tool.

In total, the 375th CSPTS applications have supported 172,000 DOD users, saved 17,244 man-hours and nearly $12 million in 2016.

The ATAT is now being used by the Inspector General Air Force-wide, which gives Installation and Mission Support Center, Major Command, and wing IG’s the ability to evaluate programs to give self-assessments and confidence values for each inspection area. The composite score gives IG the opportunity to locate weak areas and refocus on any inefficiencies.

Over the next six years, the ROBD will save the installation $360,000. Aircrews will no longer travel to the nearest available altitude chamber, which is over 300 miles away. Additionally, the ROBD takes 1/6th of the time that the two-hour altitude training chamber required and offers a more realistic experience as students fly a simulated flight profile. Finally, it allows crews to experience hypoxia without the need for pre-oxygenation or threat of decompression sickness.

AMPS is a tool for aeromedical evacuation clinicians to determine if the lifesaving medical equipment required for patient transfer may be safely integrated with aircraft systems by calculating the amount of electrical power and supplemental oxygen required, preventing aircraft and equipment damage, and ensuring life sustaining equipment is available throughout the flight.

With the Mobility Guardian Exercise around the corner, CSPTS is using the registration tool to track information for 3,000 participants from the U.S. and 25 partner nations for the 10-day exercise planned for August 2017.

EOD RAMP

Some innovations aren’t measured in money, but they are measured in efficiency and, potentially, the lives that are saved. For one Airman his innovation could do just that.

Senior Airman Emilio Solis, 375th Civil Engineer Squadron Explosive Ordnance Disposal journeyman, identified a modification to the EOD response vehicle.

His discovery involved the addition of a retractable ramp that would improve robot deployment times for emergency responses. The original ramp required two people to deploy and weighed 150 pounds.

“This routinely exposed EOD techs to potential hazardous improvised explosive device environments and the risk of injuries during operations,” said Maj. Gregory Orbino, 375th Civil Engineer Squadron.

The addition of this ramp decreased robot deployment times by 75 percent—taking just 60 seconds and requiring just one person to deploy.

Once Solis realized the hassles of the ramp, he began researching vehicle ramps for disabled people, thus leading to finding the affordable ramp they have installed today.

“The part that I am most proud of is the fact that not only does switching to this ramp help my flight, but it can also help the rest of the DOD and civilian bomb squads who may have older technology like we did,” said Solis.

He encourages other Airmen, regardless of rank or job title, to speak up if they have an idea because great ideas can come from anywhere. His accomplishments earned him the award of ICE Airman, an accolade given to Airmen across the wing for their embodiment of the ICE principles: Innovation, Communication and Excellence.

Before we had these assets, we would work with the flying units around the country so our crew members could maintain currency on various aircraft.

Lt. Col. Catherine Bonhoff, 375th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron Operations Officer

Solis isn’t alone. He and 50 other Airmen were recognized for their ability to embody ICE this year, and with another year approaching, the goal is that 50 additional Airmen will add to this atmosphere of excellence.

Lenderman said, “Ultimately, our wing cannot achieve excellence if we do not innovate ... and not one of us can do this alone. We do this together, and we do this by prioritizing our efforts and resources. I’m proud of the 375th AMW team for leading the way and making improvements not just for our wing, but for the Air Force!”

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