Education

How did your child’s school fare on last year’s state tests?

How did Belleville District 201 teachers help students top state average test scores?

Director of Student Services Melissa Taylor said in District 201, typically low-scoring groups of students surpassed the state averages this year on the new standardized test called the Partnership for Assessment for of Readiness for College and C
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Director of Student Services Melissa Taylor said in District 201, typically low-scoring groups of students surpassed the state averages this year on the new standardized test called the Partnership for Assessment for of Readiness for College and C

The report cards are in, as school leaders try to adapt to new standards, new tests and a new batch of laws pending to help more students succeed.

School leaders across the metro-east have been evaluating new standardized test scores released by the Illinois State Board of Education. The data included in the school report cards were made public at www.illinoisreportcard.com and on district websites Monday, as required by state statute.

In addition to the results of the PARCC test, each school’s online report card also includes detailed data on finances and demographics of students and teachers. Information is also available on the test performance of specific groups of children, like those living in poverty and those with special needs. It includes information on ACT scores, the high school dropout rates and how many of the students graduating from a particular school are prepared for higher education.

The test — called the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers — set new standards for K-12 students, replacing the ISAT and PSAE tests last year. PARCC differs from previous tests because it asks students to apply what they learn and provide evidence. It puts a new emphasis on critical thinking and writing.

While it was common for as many as 90 percent or more of elementary students to meet or exceed standards on the old ISATs, the current highest percentage in the four-county area of St. Clair, Madison, Monroe and Clinton was in Damiansville with 71 percent — up from 69 percent last year.

To view complete PARCC results for your child’s school district, visit www.illinoisreportcard.com.

The PARCC test reviewed English language arts and math and provided five levels of success compared to state standards and expectations: exceeds standards, meets, approaching, partially meets and did not meet standards. Composite scores measured the percentage of students who met or exceeded standards on the test, and those benchmarks did not change after last year, according to ISBE.

Across the state, an average of 33.4 percent of students met or exceeded the Illinois State Learning Standards that PARCC tests. Approximately 83 schools in St. Clair, Madison, Monroe and Clinton counties scored at or above that average, while about 93 scored below the average.

State leaders said this year’s test comes at a time of change, as high schoolers will no longer take the state exam and new plans are being drawn up to abide by the new federal Every Student Succeeds Act, which replaced No Child Left Behind.

“While some students are achieving at remarkable levels, the majority of the generation of students entrusted to us are unprepared for the world of work and for meaningful participation in our communities,” said State Superintendent Tony Smith. “If we hope to make Illinois a state where whole, healthy children are nested in whole, healthy systems, and where all citizens are socially and economically secure, we must make major changes to the way we fund our public schools and fundamentally shift our approach to education.”

Statewide, student attendance increased slightly to 94.4 percent; math scores increased from 28.2 percent to 30.5 percent meeting or exceeding standards; and the high school dropout rate dropped to 2 percent.

Elementary education

O’Fallon District 90’s PARCC scores in all seven of its schools ranked above the state average again this year. Superintendent Carrie Hruby said that’s due in part to the district’s teachers “working very hard to collaborate.”

“What’s important is that they work together to dig into the standards and determine what students need,” she said.

St. Clair County’s highest-scoring school this year is Hinchcliffe Elementary School in District 90. A majority, or 59.6 percent, of students met or exceeded standards there. But Hruby knows teachers can’t take credit for the scores alone. She also compliments the parents who are working with students outside the classroom to help them improve.

“It’s not only important that we study (the assessment results) but that we share that information with parents,” Hruby said.

It’s just one piece of the entire picture of achievement.

Carrie Hruby, O’Fallon School District 90 superintendent, on PARCC scores

In Brooklyn District 188, Superintendent Henrietta Young said she expected to see some growth over last year in the lowest-scoring school in the metro-east: Lovejoy Elementary. The school had the lowest scores again, but the percentage of students meeting or exceeding standards did increase from zero to 1.3 percent.

The difference this time is that students have been introduced to curriculum that is aligned with Common Core standards, Young said. A new math curriculum was rolled out in January 2015, and the district began using its English language arts curriculum in August 2015.

Young describes the curriculum as “rigorous and more challenging for students,” but teachers are still learning how best to implement it. “We’re expecting more growth, but it takes about five years when you make any change to see the growth that you’d like to see,” she said.

Belleville District 118 also faced challenges with curriculum, Superintendent Matt Klosterman said. Ahead of testing, teachers were using an 11-year-old English language arts curriculum.

“There were lots of gaps from that curriculum to the new standards that are in place,” Klosterman said. “... We were really trying to fill those gaps with a variety of resources.”

Some supplemental materials were purchased, but Klosterman said tools for teachers were also available for free online. The district has since purchased a new English language arts curriculum that teachers have been using for more than two months now.

District 118’s math curriculum was purchased shortly before the new Illinois standards were adopted in 2010. Klosterman said it’s “pretty well aligned” with Common Core, but that the district might start the process of updating it as early as this year.

“I’m not saying it will happen this year,” he said. It could be difficult for teachers, who are still adjusting to the new English curriculum, to implement a new math curriculum at the same time, Klosterman said. Some elementary-level educators in the district teach both reading and math.

Belleville students are also adapting to PARCC’s online format. Last year, districts had options: to continue using paper, using both paper and electronic means to test students or switching to all-electronic. District 118 decided to use only online testing from the start, and Klosterman said that could be affecting students’ scores.

He said the district offered Chromebook laptops for all students before the switch, but not all children have grown up with devices at home.

“We have students whose (only) access is what they get at school,” Klosterman said.

PARCC is “still a work in progress” for District 118, according to Klosterman. “We saw growth for the most part across the district,” he said. “Are they where we’d like to see them in all locations, across all grade levels? No.”

Last year, 26.9 percent of students in the district met or exceeded standards. That number increased to 30.3 this year. There’s always going to be room for improvement, Klosterman said, but “we feel good about the fact that we’re moving in the right direction.”

In Brooklyn, Young has reminded students and parents each year that other assessments, like AIMSweb for example, show students are improving. AIMSweb also tests students’ understanding of Common Core standards, Young said.

“I do want them to know the PARCC test is just one measure of student success,” Young said. “It’s given once a year.”

Brooklyn District 188 administers the AIMSweb Reading and Math assessment more regularly — in the fall, winter and spring — to monitor students’ progress.

“Our students showed growth on AIMSweb — more growth, in fact, in every area, at every grade,” Young said.

Young said that’s because PARCC excludes some students who meet or exceed standards in small class sizes. The rationale is that those children could be identified in data that is meant to keep them anonymous, according to Young. AIMSweb, on the other hand, includes all students’ scores in its data, she said.

While PARCC shows that 3.7 percent of students in the district met or exceeded standards — in fact, no students are shown to have exceeded — AIMSweb shows 28.3 percent, with 160 children exceeding the standards. The AIMSweb data was provided to the News-Democrat by District 188.

However, ISBE spokesman Jaclyn Matthews said that while data for groups of 10 or fewer students are suppressed on the report card to avoid identifying them, they appear as blanks, not zeroes. “If you see a zero or any data reported, that data is true and is for a group of students larger than 10,” Matthews said.

Hruby said O’Fallon District 90 also uses more assessments than just PARCC to test performance. “It’s just one piece of the entire picture of achievement,” Hruby said.

The top-scoring school in either Madison or St. Clair county this year was Cassens Elementary in Edwardsville District 7. Principal Martha Richey said it is “very exciting” to have such high achievement scores, and gave credit to the district-wide staff development and curriculum alignment that has been going on since well before PARCC was introduced.

“Our teachers are well-trained and very consistent in how they teach across the district,” Richey said. Like the PARCC test itself, teachers work with students to help them find and show evidence from the texts, and they work with each other in collaboration.

“They understand that for learning to be engaging, it has to be exciting and fun for the students,” Richey said. “They meet on a regular basis and are always working together to find innovative, exciting, original ways to engage the students.”

Edwardsville schools also try to make the testing environment low-pressure and as stress-free as possible, integrating it into their regular routine, according to district administrators. The heavy lifting comes behind the scenes, with a 40-teacher commission that began six years ago to reevaluate the district’s curriculum and align it with the new Illinois Learning Standards. They took each standard that would be tested, broke it into subsections and have been training teachers in groups on the new alignments for the past five years, according to curriculum director Kathy Rice.

“We are fortunate here to have the support of a board and administration committed to a common goal,” said Superintendent Lynda Andre. From the administration and board to the principals to the teachers, Andre said, they all have the shared goal of excellent education for the students and they “know how to get there” consistently across the largest school district in the metro-east.

“I will never say it’s easy, it’s a lot of hard work,” Andre said. “But the entire team works together at every level to make it consistent across schools and grade levels.”

83 schools in St. Clair, Madison, Monroe and Clinton counties that scored the same or above the state average

93 schools in the four-county area that scored below the state average

High schools rising

The top-scoring high school in the metro-east was Highland High School, higher than O’Fallon, Belleville or Edwardsville. Principal Karen Gauen said Highland is “blessed with a supportive community,” with involved parents and motivated students as well as “some of the best educators I have ever seen.”

Gauen said that like Edwardsville, Highland has initiated a teacher-led process to encourage teachers to collaborate on lessons engaging students in “higher-order thinking.” The process has been in place since 2010, and the teachers share results with the rest of the faculty and collaborate on new ways to improve learning.

“For the last five years our school-wide goals have incorporated (Instructional Practices Inventory), reading across the content areas and writing across the content areas,” Gauen said. “The entire school community has worked together to help HHS achieve at a high level.”

Other high schools have seen successes in their initiatives as well. This year, Belleville District 201 saw traditionally low-scoring groups of students surpass the state averages, according to Director of Student Services Melissa Taylor.

While an average of 14.7 percent of black students in the state met or exceeded standards, Taylor said 55.7 percent of black students in District 201 scored at that level. That’s also above the state average for all students tested in Illinois. Taylor said this means the achievement gap — the disparity between what students of different races score on tests — seems to be narrowing in Belleville.

“It’s not that there isn’t a gap, but there’s some really good indicators there that our students are doing really well,” she said.

Scores for students in special education programs were also higher than the averages, which is “pretty phenomenal,” according to Taylor.

“Our students with disabilities, of course just by nature of that subgroup, (are) going to have some struggles with a standardized test, but we perform quite a bit higher than the state average there, too,” Taylor said.

Throughout the district, 73.2 percent of students with disabilities met or exceeded the standards in English language arts compared to 36.2 percent of all students statewide.

“We’re really proud,” Taylor said.

33.4 state average composite proficiency score for the PARCC assessment

District 201 Superintendent Jeff Dosier said the district started gearing up for PARCC shortly after the state adopted the new standards. He said teachers “stuck to the course” after seeing encouraging results following the first round of testing last year.

“It’s a culmination of preparation...and the results are just starting to pay off,” he said.

Nearly 50 percent of Belleville East High School students met or exceeded standards — 49.4 percent. Belleville East is the second-highest scoring high school in St. Clair County; O’Fallon High School has the top score with 50.5.

Belleville West High School saw 46.9 percent of students meet or exceed standards.

But this is the last year high school students are required to go through PARCC testing. Given the favorable scores the last two years, “it’s a little bittersweet,” Dosier said.

High schools will switch this spring from PARCC to the SAT college entrance exam.

“We may be the only high school district in the state who’s kind of sad to see PARCC go because we do feel like our curriculum is well aligned with the standards and then the test has been aligned with the standards, so it’s been able to show the good work that we’re doing,” Taylor said.

Madison County Regional Superintendent Robert Daiber said he felt this was a good move, as PARCC was controversial at the high school level. “Parents often didn’t feel the curriculum had been in place long enough to measure what was taught,” Daiber said.

Daiber said others looked on PARCC as a test derived from federal administration instead of more local focus. He doesn’t agree with that assessment, but said he doesn’t believe they did justice on implementing a new test prior to implementing a new curriculum.

“We were making an effort to assess students on concepts they hadn’t had enough classroom practice on,” Daiber said.

Daiber said it would be interesting to see how PARCC scores progress as the students in early elementary grades now grow through the higher grades learning the new material.

Taylor said The College Board informed school officials that the SAT will be similarly aligned with what District 201 is already teaching. Students in District 201 will have resources to prepare for the transition, including Khan Academy accounts that give them access to free online practice tests.

Daiber recommended parents read the entire school report card, which includes demographics, finances and social factors that may give them a broader view of their child’s school and their community. There is a definite correlation between social factors such as a high poverty rate or mobility rate — the percentage of students who move in and out of the district — and the scores. The data helps them determine the best way to target resources for helping schools improve, he said.

“The better the environment for learning, the better your scores will be,” he said.

Likewise, ISBE data analyst John Barker said PARCC is a “diagnostic tool that gives us clarity” to determine where the challenges should be met. “One test score is not going to tell you the whole story,” he said, but the data will help them determine where to focus their efforts.

Elizabeth Donald: 618-239-2507, @BNDedonald

COUNTY

SCHOOL/DISTRICT

ENROLLMENT

COMPOSITE

ELA

MATH

Clinton

Carlyle CUSD 1

594

35.3

42

28.6

Clinton

Carlyle High School

79

39.2

51.9

26.3

Clinton

Carlyle Junior High School

345

27.1

34.8

19.5

Clinton

Carlyle Elementary School

170

50

51.8

48.2

Clinton

Wesclin CUSD 3

682

38.8

45.9

31.4

Clinton

Wesclin Sr High School

92

63.6

84.8

35.7

Clinton

Trenton Elem School

49

43.9

40.8

46.9

Clinton

New Baden Elementary School

61

43.4

37.7

49.2

Clinton

Wesclin Middle School

480

33.4

40

26.8

Clinton

Breese ESD 12

383

50.7

56.8

44.7

Clinton

Breese Elem School

259

46.4

53.7

39.1

Clinton

Beckemeyer Elem School

124

60

63.3

56.7

Clinton

Aviston Elem School

243

68.3

72.5

64.2

Clinton

Willow Grove Elem School

97

35.4

36.5

34.4

Clinton

Bartelso Elem School

91

69.2

75.8

62.6

Clinton

Germantown Elem School

165

61

64.6

57.3

Clinton

Damiansville Elem School

71

72.9

72.9

72.9

Clinton

Albers Elem School

119

62

65

59

Clinton

Central Comm High School

121

64.6

57.9

79.6

Clinton

St Rose Elem School

97

58.3

66.7

50

Clinton

North Wamac Grade School

87

16.8

14.5

19

Madison

Roxana CUSD 1

957

26.4

27

25.9

Madison

Roxana Sr High School

134

33.2

40.3

27.6

Madison

Roxana Junior High School

415

22.8

22

23.7

Madison

Central Elem School

252

33.6

31.6

35.6

Madison

South Roxana Elem School

156

17.7

21.3

14.2

Madison

Triad CUSD 2

1,927

33.3

35.2

31.3

Madison

Triad High School

273

28.8

34.3

19.5

Madison

Triad Middle School

851

31.3

33.4

29.1

Madison

Marine Elem School

53

51

44.2

57.7

Madison

Silver Creek Elementary

319

32.1

31.7

32.5

Madison

St Jacob Elem School

101

49

51.5

46.5

Madison

C A Henning School

330

35

37.3

32.7

Madison

Venice Elem School

62

10.5

6.5

14.5

Madison

Highland CUSD 5

1,523

43.7

50.3

37

Madison

Highland High School

242

51.7

63.3

38.4

Madison

Highland Middle School

638

49.2

51.8

46.7

Madison

Alhambra Primary School

48

36.2

31.9

40.4

Madison

Grantfork Upper Elementary

66

20.5

22.7

18.2

Madison

Highland Elementary School

529

37.4

47.8

26.9

Madison

Edwardsville CUSD 7

3,961

50.2

50.8

49.7

Madison

Edwardsville High School

613

39.2

46.1

30

Madison

Liberty Middle School

934

48.4

46.8

49.9

Madison

Lincoln Middle School

779

43.8

38.7

48.9

Madison

Columbus Elem School

384

60.2

63.9

56.5

Madison

Worden Elementary School

260

47.3

50.8

43.8

Madison

Woodland Elementary School

463

57.9

60.3

55.5

Madison

Cassens Elementary School

528

61.5

62.9

60

Madison

Bethalto CUSD 8

1,298

27.6

31.7

23.4

Madison

Civic Memorial High School

215

36.8

52.1

19.9

Madison

Wilbur Trimpe Middle School

576

23.2

23.6

22.8

Madison

Meadowbrook Intermediate

336

24

28.7

19.3

Madison

Parkside Primary School

171

38.2

38.8

37.6

Madison

Granite City CUSD 9

3,261

14.5

16.9

12

Madison

Granite City High School

433

25

30.9

15.8

Madison

Coolidge Junior High School

947

12.4

17.1

7.8

Madison

Grigsby Intermediate School

945

9.6

10.2

8.9

Madison

Frohardt Elementary School

179

19.7

17.4

21.9

Madison

Maryville Elem School

144

21.4

19.7

23.1

Madison

Mitchell Elementary School

164

10.7

8.5

12.8

Madison

Worthen Elem School

129

23.4

25

21.9

Madison

Wilson Elem School

129

9.1

9.4

8.7

Madison

Prather Elementary School

191

20.5

21.4

19.7

Madison

Collinsville CUSD 10

3,376

22.9

23.6

22.1

Madison

Collinsville High School

481

17.5

24.1

10.6

Madison

Collinsville Middle School

957

20.8

23.6

18

Madison

Webster Elementary School

125

17.2

17.2

17.2

Madison

Caseyville Elementary School

157

16

16

16

Madison

Kreitner Elem School

132

13.1

10.8

15.4

Madison

Jefferson Elem School

53

30.2

24.5

35.8

Madison

John Renfro Elementary School

212

20.7

22.9

18.5

Madison

Summit Elementary School

55

31.5

27.8

35.2

Madison

Maryville Elem School

176

52

47.4

56.6

Madison

Twin Echo Elem School

85

36.4

28

45

Madison

Dorris Intermediate School

943

23.8

22.4

25.2

Madison

Alton CUSD 11

3,281

25

29.4

20.4

Madison

Alton High School

444

27.6

28.7

25.6

Madison

Alton Middle School

1,413

23.7

30.2

17.2

Madison

Eunice Smith Elem School

170

36.2

44.2

28.2

Madison

Gilson Brown Elem School

163

24.1

26.3

21.9

Madison

Lewis & Clark Elem School

146

36.5

36.1

36.8

Madison

Lovejoy Elem School

159

24.8

30.6

19.1

Madison

West Elementary School

238

23.1

24.7

21.6

Madison

East Elementary School

272

17.2

22

12.4

Madison

North Elementary School

273

26.1

26.6

25.6

Madison

Madison CUSD 12

360

5.3

6.9

3.7

Madison

Madison Senior High School

37

6.8

14.7

0

Madison

Madison Jr High School

140

5.2

8.1

2.2

Madison

Bernard Long Elem School

183

5.1

4.5

5.6

Madison

East Alton SD 13

470

18

18.9

17.1

Madison

East Alton Middle School

249

14.8

17.1

12.4

Madison

Eastwood Elem School

221

21.6

20.8

22.4

Madison

East Alton-Wood River High

122

17.6

31.7

3.4

Madison

Wood River-Hartford ESD 15

488

12.7

14.8

10.5

Madison

Lewis-Clark Jr High School

239

11.6

13.4

9.7

Madison

Lewis-Clark Elem School

185

13.3

15.8

10.9

Madison

Hartford Elem School

64

14.8

17.2

12.5

Monroe

Valmeyer CUSD 3

259

36.6

36.3

36.9

Monroe

Valmeyer High School

33

46.2

60.6

31.3

Monroe

Valmeyer Jr High

107

36.2

37.1

35.2

Monroe

Valmeyer Elementary School

119

34.3

28.8

39.8

Monroe

Columbia CUSD 4

1,060

54.8

50.7

59.1

Monroe

Columbia High School

173

61.8

61.4

62.5

Monroe

Columbia Middle School

593

49.1

42.2

55.9

Monroe

Parkview Elementary School

294

62.8

61.4

64.1

Monroe

Waterloo CUSD 5

1,397

54.2

54.4

53.9

Monroe

Waterloo High School

217

47.1

38.2

54.6

Monroe

Waterloo Jr High School

589

51.8

57.8

45.7

Monroe

Roger Elem School

203

66.3

62

70.5

Monroe

Gardner Elem School

388

55.7

54

57.4

Monroe

Coulterville USD 1

105

24

34

12.4

Monroe

Coulterville High School

18

59.1

66.7

Monroe

Coulterville Jr High School

39

27.6

36.8

18.4

Monroe

Coulterville Elem School

48

12.8

19.1

6.4

Monroe

Red Bud CUSD 132

478

27.7

37.2

18

Monroe

Red Bud High School

92

15.6

20.7

9.9

Monroe

Red Bud Elem School

386

30.5

41.3

19.8

Monroe

Prairie Du Rocher Elem School

106

14.6

19.8

9.4

St. Clair

Lebanon CUSD 9

320

26.6

34.1

18.9

St Clair

Lebanon High School

154

24.7

36.9

11.5

St Clair

Lebanon Elem School

166

28.4

31.5

25.3

St Clair

Mascoutah CUD 19

1,990

46.9

51.4

42.3

St Clair

Mascoutah High School

281

40.4

49.3

29.4

St. Clair

Mascoutah Middle School

843

49.3

57.7

41

St. Clair

Mascoutah Elem School

432

45.6

45.8

45.5

St. Clair

Scott Elem School

300

43.3

43

43.6

St. Clair

Wingate Elem School

134

56.3

53.7

59

St Clair

St Libory Elem School

53

42.3

32.7

51.9

St Clair

Marissa CUSD 40

297

17.8

22

13.4

St Clair

Marissa Jr & Sr High School

127

18.2

20.7

15.5

St Clair

Marissa Elem School

170

17.5

22.9

12

St Clair

New Athens CUSD 60

298

37

44.9

28.5

St Clair

New Athens High School

62

27.8

40.7

7.9

St Clair

New Athens Jr High

126

38.7

48.8

28.3

St Clair

New Athens Elem

110

39.3

42.7

35.8

St Clair

Freeburg Elem School

518

48.2

52.2

44.3

St Clair

Freeburg Comm. High School

153

21.1

28.5

12.1

St Clair

Shiloh Village SD 185

406

54.6

59.9

49.4

St Clair

Shiloh Middle School

277

53.4

60.5

46.3

St Clair

Shiloh Elementary School

129

57.3

58.6

55.9

St Clair

O’Fallon CCSD 90

2,427

48.7

55.8

41.5

St Clair

Fulton Jr High School

537

47.9

58.9

36.9

St Clair

Amelia Carriel Jr High

703

45.8

56.2

35.4

St Clair

Estelle Kampmeyer Elem School

214

46.3

52.4

40.3

St Clair

J Emmett Hinchcliffe Sr Elem

168

59.6

60.2

59

St Clair

Laverna Evans Elem School

183

51.7

61.1

42.3

St Clair

Marie Schaefer Elem School

271

46.6

50.8

42.4

St Clair

Delores Moye Elem School

351

51.7

51.3

52.2

St Clair

Central SD 104

389

19.1

18.2

20.1

St Clair

Joseph Arthur Middle School

259

18.8

17.6

20

St Clair

Central Elem School

130

19.8

19.4

20.2

St Clair

Pontiac-W Holliday SD 105

462

39.5

46.2

32.7

St Clair

Pontiac Jr High School

219

42

50.9

33

St Clair

William Holliday Elem School

243

37.2

42

32.5

St Clair

Grant CCSD 110

384

23.1

26.4

19.7

St Clair

Grant Middle School

242

24.6

28.4

20.8

St Clair

Illini Elem School

142

20.5

23

18

St Clair

Wolf Branch SD 113

569

48.6

51

46.2

St Clair

Wolf Branch Middle School

396

47

51.9

42.2

St Clair

Wolf Branch Elem School

173

52.1

48.8

55.3

St Clair

Whiteside SD 115

849

30.3

35

25.7

St Clair

Whiteside Middle School

577

31.5

37.6

25.4

St Clair

Whiteside Elem School

272

27.9

29.4

26.3

St Clair

High Mount Elem School

281

34.6

42.9

26.3

St Clair

Belleville SD 118

2,437

30.3

33.3

27.3

St Clair

Central Jr High School

387

34.7

42.1

27.3

St Clair

West Jr High School

373

27.1

33.9

20.3

St Clair

Abraham Lincoln Elem School

323

27

29.3

24.7

St Clair

Douglas Elem School

173

16.6

19.2

14

St Clair

Franklin Elem School

92

22

22

22

St Clair

Henry Raab Elem School

109

32.2

33.6

30.8

St Clair

Jefferson Elem School

201

28

31.3

24.7

St Clair

Roosevelt Elem School

201

42.7

42.9

42.6

St Clair

Union Elem School

292

34.8

34.7

34.9

St Clair

Westhaven Elementary

286

31.1

30.5

31.7

St Clair

Belle Valley School

655

29.2

39.7

18.8

St Clair

Smithton Elem School

347

53.9

53.7

54

St Clair

Millstadt Consolidated School

523

48.7

54.9

42.6

St Clair

Harmony Emge SD 175

507

22.1

29

15.2

St Clair

Emge Jr High School

178

15.8

25.3

6.3

St Clair

Ellis Elem School

91

25.6

29.5

21.6

St Clair

Harmony Intermediate Center

238

25.4

31.5

19.3

St Clair

Signal Hill Elem School

230

39.7

38.6

40.8

St Clair

Cahokia CUSD 187

1,866

5.3

5.7

4.8

St Clair

Cahokia High School

243

5.9

10.4

1.3

St Clair

7th Grade Academy

206

5.9

5.6

6.1

St Clair

8th Grade Academy

190

5.1

5.4

4.9

St Clair

Oliver Parks 6th Grade School

219

2.3

1.4

3.3

St Clair

Huffman Elem School

361

5.2

3.9

6.5

St Clair

Penniman Elem School

435

3.4

4

2.8

St Clair

Estelle Sauget School of Choice

212

11

11.3

10.6

St Clair

Brooklyn UD 188

68

3.7

7.4

0

St Clair

Lovejoy Technology Academy

12

8.3

16.7

0

St Clair

Lovejoy Middle School

16

6.3

12.5

0

St Clair

Lovejoy Elementary School

40

1.3

2.5

0

St Clair

East St Louis SD 189

2,888

5.6

7.5

3.7

St Clair

SIU Charter Sch of East St Louis

23

21.1

47.8

2.9

St Clair

East St Louis Sr High School

347

4.2

7.5

0.4

St Clair

Mason/Clark Middle School

594

2.6

3.7

1.6

St Clair

East St Louis-Lincoln Middle School

507

8.1

13.6

2.6

St Clair

Dunbar Elem School

283

6.7

6.2

7.2

St Clair

Annette Officer Elementary

286

5.1

5.6

4.5

St Clair

Katie Harper-Wright Elementary

277

7.1

8

6.2

St Clair

Gordon Bush Elementary

246

3.1

3.7

2.5

St Clair

James Avant Elementary School

325

7

7.1

6.8

St Clair

Dupo CUSD 196

558

31.3

38.8

23.7

St Clair

Dupo High School

89

13.1

15.7

10.1

St Clair

Dupo Jr High School

150

34.9

50.7

19.2

St Clair

Bluffview Elem School

319

34.6

39.9

29.4

St Clair

Belleville Twp HSD 201

1,103

48.2

73.2

24.1

St Clair

Belleville High School-East

577

49.4

73.9

25.9

St Clair

Belleville High School-West

526

46.9

72.4

22.2

St Clair

O’Fallon High School

570

50.5

47.9

53.5

STATE OF ILLINOIS

1,050,307

33.4

36.2

30.5

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