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Pups who weren’t quite suited for TSA work are now available for adoption in Texas

Search and rescue K9 dogs go though training

(FILE VIDEO - 2018) Search and rescue dogs and their handlers came from all over the United States to train in search and rescue techniques in Kansas.
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(FILE VIDEO - 2018) Search and rescue dogs and their handlers came from all over the United States to train in search and rescue techniques in Kansas.

If you’re looking to add a new pup to the family, look no further than the Transportation Security Administration.

TSA has implemented its Canine Adoption Program to help find new homes for dogs that aren’t quite the right fit for government work.

TSA says a number of breeds are have been available in the past, adding that Labrador Retrievers and German Shorthaired Pointers are somewhat common along with the occasional German Shepherd and Belgian Malinois.

Currently, TSA says the program is closed to applications due to “an extensive waiting list and a lack of available adoption candidates.”

The agency has described the dogs as being vaccinated, “highly active” and great additions to families after a little coaching — most are untrained and not yet housebroken.

For those wanting to adopt a TSA dog in the future, there are a few requirements, including a fenced-in yard, no plans to move for at least six months, and up-to-date vaccinations on all other pets in the home, the website says.

The ages of children in the home will also be taken into consideration, the agency says.

Those hoping to adopt must travel to Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland in San Antonio, Texas, to pick up their pup. The agency will not ship any dogs.

Hopeful adopters are also told to expect to make multiple visits before they’re allowed to adopt to ensure a good fit between the dogs and their potential owners. Same-day adoption are not allowed, the agency says.

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Dawson covers goings-on across the central region, from breaking to bizarre. She is an MSt candidate at the University of Cambridge and lives in Kansas City.
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