Editorials

Collinsville mayor, Illinois House speaker already know what you’re thinking

Discussing referendums asking if Collinsville officials should resign

Rob Dorman discusses the non-binding referendums he wants on the November 2016 election ballot in Collinsville, Illinois, asking if Councilwoman Cheryl Brombolich and Mayor John Miller should resign. A judge from the Madison County, Illinois, cour
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Rob Dorman discusses the non-binding referendums he wants on the November 2016 election ballot in Collinsville, Illinois, asking if Councilwoman Cheryl Brombolich and Mayor John Miller should resign. A judge from the Madison County, Illinois, cour

Rob Dorman just wanted to ask Collinsville voters a question. The Independent Maps group just wanted to ask Illinois voters a question.

Both got plenty of registered voters to sign petitions agreeing that the questions should be asked Nov. 8. Both got shot down by the powers-that-be, because the powers-that-be already know the answers to the questions and don’t like the answers.

You don’t need to be asked whether Collinsville Mayor John Miller should resign for accepting free fill dirt from a city contractor. You don’t need to be asked whether Collinsville Councilwoman Cheryl Brombolich should resign for using city accounts for her personal needs and then suing the city for revealing it. You don’t need to be asked whether the Illinois Constitution should be amended to take away state legislators’ power to draw their own districts because they have drawn them to protect their re-election.

A reader recently came by wearing a T-shirt that sums up this election: Three check boxes next to “Republican,” “Democrat” and “(Hacked) Off,” with the last one checked. The status quo fuels the anger by acting like it is not responsive to the people who made it the status quo.

Collinsville Mayor John Miller lacked the judgment to not accept $1,600 in free fill dirt for his backyard from a city contractor. Then he lacked the judgment not to fire the city manager who exposed Dirtgate and Brombolich’s city account abuse. Then he lacked the judgment not to rule on an advisory referendum asking that he quit as mayor.

He knows the people’s answer.

The four Democrats on the Illinois Supreme Court accepted Illinois House Speaker Mike Madigan’s interpretation of the Illinois Constitution. Citizens cannot possibly be asked to make a change on who draws state lawmakers’ district boundaries. Justices for the first time in this type of decision ignored the debates of the 1970 state constitutional convention, which clearly showed the framers did want citizens to have that power, and then this week refused to reconsider their decision when that fact was pointed out.

They and their puppetmaster know the people’s answer.

When Miller or Madigan want your opinion, they’ll ask for it.

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