Editorials

Have gun, will travel — and not just by MetroLink

Three shootings in less than two weeks have some MetroLink riders questioning whether riding the train is safe. Place and police are important to personal safety, but so are personal actions.
Three shootings in less than two weeks have some MetroLink riders questioning whether riding the train is safe. Place and police are important to personal safety, but so are personal actions. snagy@bnd.com

Three shootings in two weeks along MetroLink. Is it safe to ride the train?

Woman attacked on bike trail. Is it safe to use the trail?

Teen carjacked at high school. Is it safe to go to high school?

Think on that last one for a moment.

Predatory criminals are mobile. They can strike anywhere, even in front of your home.

“It’s terrible that it happens on the MetroLink, but people get robbed in shootings everywhere,” said Paul Serverian, 65, of Belleville.

Everywhere doesn’t have video surveillance, uniformed police and call buttons. Even with all that, the MetroLink shooters were bold enough to attack people with police officers in the area.

But then it feels like there’s never a cop around when you need one.

So what to do? You must take responsibility for your own safety.

That may mean you stay on the train, or stay with the crowd, or ask a cop or a trustworthy fellow passenger to walk you to your car. It may be as simple as being aware of your surroundings.

Common sense tells you that the same place that is safe at 11 a.m. is not safe at 11 p.m. If your arms are loaded with packages and you are talking on your cell, you make a better target than someone walking briskly and scanning the area. If you throw your keys and run, your carjacking is less likely to become a kidnapping.

You can’t guarantee your personal safety, or expect police to be everywhere. You can improve your odds.

  Comments