Editorials

Something to ‘like’ when criminals live stream their exploits

When you are fleeing the cops the obvious thing to do is to stream your illegal activity live, like Cameron Taylor did recently with police lights in his rearview mirror.
When you are fleeing the cops the obvious thing to do is to stream your illegal activity live, like Cameron Taylor did recently with police lights in his rearview mirror. Facebook

There are likely a lot of folks shaking their heads about the narcissistic nature of our culture, where every move must be documented and shared, where virtual reality is painted as better than real reality and where extreme behavior is celebrated.

Maybe we should quit shaking our heads. Maybe we should encourage this trend, not that our disapproval would ever stop it.

You see, our men and woman behind the badge and behind the law books have a tough job. DNA can’t solve every crime, but maybe social media can.

We had the guy on Staten Island threaten to kill the convenience store clerk if he failed to stream the robbery live. The four Chicago teens were charged with a hate crime for beating another team and streaming it live.

Now we get our own, local virtual version of true crime. A guy leads local cops on a chase that he streams live while offering commentary about the police and shout-outs to his mom and his fans.

Thank you, Cameron Taylor. You just handed the beleaguered police of Washington Park and prosecutors of St. Clair County an easy win.

Keep those streams and tweets coming, criminals. Cruel and unusual punishment awaits when they take away your smart phone and put you in a place without followers or friends.

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