Editorials

Thickburger may put ex-con politician into deep fryer

Newly-convicted federal felon Oliver W. Hamilton meets with ex-con Kelvin Ellis, who is on supervised release after a 10-year federal sentence for trying to have a witness killed, tax evasion and vote buying. New East St. Louis School District 189 board member LaKeisha N. Adams was with them at lunch, 1 p.m. April 26 in Caseyville. Ellis may be in trouble for consorting with a felon.
Newly-convicted federal felon Oliver W. Hamilton meets with ex-con Kelvin Ellis, who is on supervised release after a 10-year federal sentence for trying to have a witness killed, tax evasion and vote buying. New East St. Louis School District 189 board member LaKeisha N. Adams was with them at lunch, 1 p.m. April 26 in Caseyville. Ellis may be in trouble for consorting with a felon. Provided

It was supposed to be a cheap lunch at Hardee’s, but for Kelvin Ellis it may become very costly with a side order of cosmic justice.

If you don’t remember Kelvin Ellis, he was the guy who turned East St. Louis City Hall into a whorehouse — literally — as opposed to the figurative sense created by decades of human exploitation and degradation in exchange for a little cash. He was the one who thought his plot to kill a government witness against him had succeeded when shown the woman’s “bloody” photo created by a little FBI ketchup artistry. He bought votes. He didn’t even pay taxes on his taxpayer-funded salary.

So he went out for a burger with the newest felon convicted of thieving from the city’s poor, former East St. Louis Township Supervisor Oliver W. Hamilton. Hamilton is about to go away for five years after taking at least $230,000 in public dollars and only being convicted for $40,000 of it.

Were they discussing life in Club Fed? Job prospects post-sentence? Investment strategies for ill-gotten gain?

What we hope wasn’t happening was that these two masters of public corruption weren’t schooling the newest member of that base of political patronage and power, the East St. Louis District 189 School Board. LaKeisha N. Adams was with them at lunch, 1 p.m. April 26 in Caseyville.

We know that because someone took their picture and it became part of the filing to revoke Ellis’ supervised release. He consorted with a known felon, and he could go back to prison for even longer than the 10 years to that he was originally sentenced.

Ten years didn’t seem like much for the human misery Ellis created and the human life he thought he took. Maybe some higher power is setting that right, or maybe the U.S. Attorney’s office is just getting it right.

  Comments