Letters to the Editor

Diplomacy

Current political discourse concerning the proposed agreement limiting Iran’s ability to create nuclear weapons is perplexing. By historical standards, negotiating an agreement with a sovereign nation limiting its ability to define for itself which military weapons it might possess is an extraordinary achievement. Indeed, any agreement that permits international observers to inspect its sovereign territory is one that the United States would not itself abide.

Equally disconcerting is the respect afforded the leader of a foreign state when he publicly castigates our elected president for his successful efforts to negotiate a proximate solution to the nuclear issue and openly lobbies the Congress to reject the agreement. Moreover, this same prime minister has effectively rejected the two-state solution to the Israeli/Palestinian dispute that multiple American presidents have advocated while Israeli authorities continue to permit the dispossession of Palestinian lands and the inhumane treatment afforded its inhabitants.

Then too, the power wielded by an important segment of the Israeli’s lobby over members of Congress is egregiously offensive. Though we rightly value free speech, the implicit threat of foreign-oriented pressure groups and individuals to influence American public policy through significant campaign donations is a national disgrace. Happily, American Jews are not united in toeing the pernicious line of the current Israeli prime minister. Many, including members of Congress, favor a diplomatic solution to a dangerous situation.

Americans should rightly reject endless wars in the Middle East. Diplomacy is the sensible solution that best serves the interests of the United States.

Albert Melone

Belleville

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