Metro-East News

Roger That: Obama once again delays plan for closing Guantanamo Bay prison

Mike Fitzgerald
Mike Fitzgerald

Obama administration officials once again have put an indefinite hold on submitting to Congress their plan to close the military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, according to DefenseOne.

White House officials have been telling lawmakers for at least five months that they’re in the “final stages” of drafting the plan to close the facility. After delaying the plan to conduct surveys of potential alternative sites in Colorado, South Carolina and Kansas, officials and lawmakers said it would come this past week. Now, the plan has been held and is not expected until sometime in the next month.

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Military.com is reporting that French-made anti-tank weapons supplied to the Kurds and U.S. versions given to the Iraqi Security Forces have been blunting a main method of attack by the Islamic State, according to Kurdish and U.S. Central Command officials.

Kurdish Peshmerga forces used the MILAN (Missile d'Infanterie Leger Antichar, or light infantry anti-tank missile) to stop ISIS counter-attacks using vehicle-borne improvised explosive devices in the successful push to take the northwestern Iraqi town of Sinjar last week, according to the Kurdish Security Council and Western reporters traveling with the Kurds.

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The carnage in Paris on Friday came a day after the U.S. Justice Department warned of the potential for random ISIS-inspired attacks on service members in the United States, according to Military.com.

Assistant Attorney General John Carlin warned Thursday after the arrest of an Ohio man that the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) was seeking to use Internet propaganda to convince sympathizers to attack members of the military in the United States.

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On Veterans Day, the White House announced support for a bill designed to limit for-profit schools’ access to federal funds through the Post-9/11 G.I. Bill, according to the blog Task and Purpose.

Under the current law, for-profit schools must get at least 10 percent of their revenue from nonfederal sources, but the new bill — dubbed the Protecting Our Students and Taxpayers Act of 2015 — would increase that requirement to 15 percent, according to the bill.

Mike Fitzgerald: 618-239-2533, @MikeFitz3000

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