Highland News Leader

Highland soldiers continued to fight, were wounded in waning days of World War I

John Frey was assigned to the 127 th Infantry, 32 nd Division and arrived in France in September 1918 and saw action in the Meuse-Argonne offensive, Oct. 19-Nov. 11.
John Frey was assigned to the 127 th Infantry, 32 nd Division and arrived in France in September 1918 and saw action in the Meuse-Argonne offensive, Oct. 19-Nov. 11.

“The German general Ludendorff would not agree to total surrender and sent a message to the troops, saying the terms were unacceptable to the German Army. Gen. Ludendorff was forced to resign his post on Oct. 26, 1918. The Polish government, which the Germans had established, declared its independence in mid-October. At the same time, the Allies recognized an independent Czechoslovakia and supported an enlarged Serbia, to be named Yugoslavia. Austria-Hungary split apart, and Hungary negotiated a separate Armistice. Turkey surrendered on Oct. 30. The ground fighting continued, but one thing was clear, the war had to stop.” (History of World War I by Marshall Cavendish.)

Now back to Pass in Review by Allan C. Huber, which covered Highland soldiers in World War I.

“Pvt. Alvin L. Frey, age 24, son of Peter Frey, was called Feb. 23, 1918 and was sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky., and assigned to 335th Infantry, 84th Division in France in September. He saw action on Flanders front in Belgium in the Lyz-Scheldt offensive, Oct. 30-Nov. 11. He was discharged April 29, 1919

“Pfc. John P. Frey, age 23, the son of Pius Frey, was called June 24, 1918 and sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky.” John P. and Edna Raeber Frey (my wife Lorna’s aunt) had married on Oct. 30, 1917. (John’s photo with today’s column.)

“John Frey was assigned to the 127th Infantry, 32nd Division and arrived in France in September 1918 and saw action in the Meuse-Argonne offensive, Oct. 19-Nov. 11. John was in the Army of Occupation at Rossbach, Germany. John was discharged May 18, 1919.”

John and Edna’s daughter, the late Genevieve Frey (Mrs. Calvin) Koelz, was born May 22, 1920. It is their granddaughter, Lynn Koelz (Mrs. Tom) Koch, who has supplied the photo of her grandpa Pfc. John P. Frey, for today’s column.

Lynn also supplied the photo of her great uncle, Pvt. Fremont Buchmiller, who also served in WWI. Fremont married John’s sister, Clara Frey. Fremont Buchmiller was not in the book, Pass in Review, as he lived north of Pierron in Bond County, just north of U.S. 40, now Interstate 70. His story will follow later.

“Pvt. Paul J. Frey, age 30, the son of Joseph Frey, was called June 24, 1918 and was sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky. Paul was transferred to 356th Infantry, 89th Division in France and saw service on Amiens sector, Sept. 17-Oct. 6; then the American sector in the Meuse-Argonne offensive, Oct. 19-Nov. 11. He was discharged June 10, 1919.

“Pvt. August Gilomen, age 25, son of Mrs. Bertha Gilomen, was called April 29, 1918 and was sent to Camp Dix, N.J. He crossed to Calais, France, June 9 and saw action on St. Mihiel front Sept. 12-16, and Meuse-Argonne offensive Oct. 4-11, 1918. He was in the Army of Occupation and was discharged July 10, 1919.

“August’s brother, Cpl. Benjamin Gilomen, age 22, was called in Sept. 19, 1917 and was sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky. Ben was assigned to 333rd Infantry, 84th Division, then to 33rd Division. He was sent to France in June 1918 and trained with the French. He saw action in Meuse-Argonne offensive, Bois-De-Forges, Sept. 26; and Bois-De-Chaume, Oct.10, 1918. He was in the Army of Occupation and was discharged May 31, 1919.”

(I have given the book Camp Zachary Taylor, Pictorial Review to the Highland Home Museum, originally given to me by Cpl. Carl Siegrist.)

Pvt. Nelson Glock, age 24, the son of Adolph Glock, enlisted Nov. 18, 1915 and was sent to Jefferson Barracks, Mo., then to Fort Bliss, Texas. He was sent to France in 1918 and was wounded while in action, serving 19 months overseas and was finishing his enlistment at Fort Leavensworth, Kan., when the book Pass in Review was written in 1920. Two of his Glock’s brothers also served. Alfred was called, and Wilfred enlisted, but neither saw overseas action.

“Pvt. John M. Greely, age 24, son of Mrs. Mary Greeley, served three years in National Guard before the war. He saw action on the Lorraine front, Champagne front and Chateau Thierry, where he was wounded, on Aug. 4, 1918, taking machine gun bullet to right leg and right hand. He was sent to Iowa in November 1918. While recovering, he was sent with other 42nd Division patients on a tour of the U.S. in behalf of the fifth Liberty Loan drive. He was discharged June 1, 1919.

“His brother, Cpl. Timothy A. Greely, enlisted in the Marine Corps on March, 1916 and received his radio training at Mare Island Training Station was sent to Managua, Nicarauga, Central America from September 1916 to April 1919, arriving back to San Diego, Calif., for further duty. His enlistment expired March 17, 1920.”

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