Highland News Leader

Many Highland soldiers served in Army of Occupation after World War I

Roland Harris
Roland Harris

The Allies’ Army of Occupation spread all over Germany and German-held territories following the Armistice that ended World War I to try and bring some closure to the peace.

However, Europe was a mess following the most destructive war the world had ever seen. In addition to the casualties of the war, the “Spanish Flu” pandemic would kill another 20 million people around the globe in 1918-1919.

“The war had merely inflamed long-standing rivalries and confirmed old hatreds…

“The war had also sparked a ‘Bolshevik Revolution’ in Russia that threatened the capitalist world system…

“The Paris Peace Conference began on Jan. 12, 1919, with almost 40 nations being represented… The real power at the conference lay with the ‘Big Five,’ Italy, Japan, Britain, France and the United States… Even these nations had disagreements over territorial demands, material compensation, and future security…. Hence, much of the negotiations over the next 18 months, consisted of intense wrangling over borders, money and military obligations… Conflicts among the Allies, because of their different visions for the post-war world. (Quotes from History of World War I, by Marshall Cavendish, from Louis Latzer Memorial Public Library.)

Now, back to Pass in Review, by Pvt. Allan C. Huber, which documented Highland soldiers’ contributions to the war effort.

“Pvt. Claud L. Harrington, 24, the son of James Harrington, was called June 24, 1918 and sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky., and transferred to Co. H. 156th Infantry, 39th Division. He arrived in France in September 1918 and saw action in the Argonne offensive, Sept. 29-Oct. 14. He was in the Army of Occupation and was discharged, June 13, 1919.

“Pvt. Philip J. Hartlieb, 28, the son of Philip Hartlieb, enlisted in the Marine Corps on Dec. 12, 1917 and trained at Paris Island, S.C. He was then sent to radio school, then sent to the Virgin Islands, West Indies, in the Signal Battalion, Radio Service, 1st Division, Marines. After one year, he was discharged on May 21, 1919.

“Pvt. Joseph A. Haselhorst, 24, the son of Mrs. Anton Haselhorst, was called April 29, 1918 and sent to Camp Dix, N.J., then assigned to 309th Field Artillery, Headquarters Co., and landed in France on June 15, 1918. He had further training with the French and saw action on the Toul sector, Aug. 20, 1918 to Oct. 4; St. Mihiel, Sept. 12-16l and Preny Raid, Sept. 26-28. Then, he joined the American forces in the Meuse-Argonne offensive, Oct. 18-Nov. 11. He was in the Army of Occupation and was discharged May 21, 1919.

“Pvt. Ernest H. Helbing, 26, the son of Mrs. Henry Helbing, was called April 29, 1918 and sent to Camp Dix, N.J., then sent to France in July 1918, with Co. F, 147th Infantry, 37th Division. He saw action in Meuse-Argonne offensive in September 1918. He was sent to the hospital with pneumonia and sailed from France on Nov. 10, 1918 and was discharged Jan. 5, 1919.

“Pvt. Walter Heller, 27, the son of John Heller, was called Oct. 3, 1917 and sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky. He was assigned to Co. A, 333rd Infantry, 84th Division. He was transferred to Co. H, 132nd Infantry, 33rd Division and arrived in France in May 1918. He saw action with the French on the Vaden Line, Somme Front, June 23, 1918. Later, he was with American troops at the Meuse-Argonne offensive, Sept. 26, and was at St. Hiliare, France, until Nov. 11, 1918. He was in the Army of Occupation at Consdorf, Luxemburg. He was discharged May 10, 1919. After his discharge, Heller contacted typhoid fever and died on Nov. 25, 1919.

“Pvt. August H. Herzberg, 23, son of Henry Herzberg, was called April 29, 1918 and sent to Camp Dix, N.J., and transferred to Co. L, 147th Regiment, 37th Division. He arrived in France in June 1918 and saw action with the French on Baccarat sector, Aug. 4-Sept. 16. Then, he was with the American troops at Meuse-Argonne offensive, Sept. 26-Oct.1; Pannes Sector, Oct. 8-16; and Ypres-Lys, Oct. 31-Nov. 11. He was in the Army of Occupation and was discharged April 13, 1919.

“Pvt. Leo J. Hobbs, 24, the son of James Hobbs, was called Sept. 19, 1917 and sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky., where he was assigned to Co. B, 333rd Infantry, 84th Division. Hobbs was later transferred to the 33rd Division and sent to France on May 17, 1918, and into training with the French, seeing action on the Somme front and then with the Americans during the Meuse-Argonne offensive, where he was wounded. After a short period of time, he was able to rejoin his outfit and then was in the Army of Occupation in Luxemburg. He was discharged on May 31, 1919.

“Sgt. Clarence H. Hoefle, 23, the son of Charles Hoefle, was called Sept. 19, 1917 and sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky., where he was assigned to Co. B, 333rd Infantry, 84th Division. He was then transferred to the 309th Headquarters troop, G2 Intelligence, and arrived in France in March 1918, where he did clerical work in the Intelligence Department during his service in France. He was discharged July 7, 1919.”

Wagoner Milton Hoefle was in my column of Aug. 17, 2016, as he was gassed on the Alsne-Marne front on Aug. 8, 1918. He recovered and returned to his ambulance driving and was in the St. Mihiel offensive, Sept. 12-16 and with the American offensive at Meuse-Argonne, Sept. 26-Oct. 25, 1918. He was in the Army of Occupation at Coblenz, Germany, where he was again a hospital patient. He was discharged July 26, 1919.

“Cpl. Edgar A. Hoffman, 24, the son of Mrs. Ida Hoffman, was called Feb. 23, 1918 and was sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky., and transferred to Co. I, 335th Infantry, 84th Division. He was sent to France on Sept. 17, 1918, and transferred to the 1st Division. He saw action in the Meuse-Argonne offensive in October 1918. He was in the Army of Occupation, near Coblenz, Germany, and was discharged Sept. 26, 1919.” (Edgar Hoffman, Stuart Drum and Frank Winter started the Highland News, newspaper in 1920 and merged with the Highland Leader in 1921 to become the Highland News Leader.)

“Pvt. Emanual J. Holliger, 21, the son of Jacob Holliger, was called Oct. 3, 1917 and sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky., and assigned to Co. B, 333rd Infantry, 84th Division. He later transferred to Headquarters Co., 132nd Infantry, 33rd Division, and was in France in May 1918, where he joined up with the British Expeditionary forces and saw action in engagements, starting on July 4, 1918. He was then at the Verdun sector, Sept. 8-25, and with the American Meuse-Argonne offensive Sept. 26-Oct. 25, 1918, and the Tryon sector, Nov. 1-11, and then the Army of Occupation in Luxemburg. He was discharged May 31, 1919.”

Emanual J. Holliger was also the brother of Miss Florence Holliger, a long-time first-grade teacher at Highland. I will have her collection of her many student photos on display at the Highland Home Museum, which we hope to have open in December.

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