Highland News Leader

Seven Huber family members from Highland served in World War I

Pvt. Alvis E. Jotte, 26, the son of Mrs. Theodore Jotte and saw action at Lys-Scheldt front in Belgium, near Audenaarde, during World War I. He was discharged April 29, 1919. Alvis returned to Highland and had a fruit and vegetable market at 818 Main St. for almost 10 years before he died in 1928. This photo is of the Jotte Fruit Market. From left are Walter Duncan, Martina Jotte, Albert Spengel, and Jac. Neumann. Duncan drove the butcher cart, delivering meat cut by Spengel, while Neumann and Jotte handled the fruit and vegetable departments of the store. The barrels in the front contain pickles.
Pvt. Alvis E. Jotte, 26, the son of Mrs. Theodore Jotte and saw action at Lys-Scheldt front in Belgium, near Audenaarde, during World War I. He was discharged April 29, 1919. Alvis returned to Highland and had a fruit and vegetable market at 818 Main St. for almost 10 years before he died in 1928. This photo is of the Jotte Fruit Market. From left are Walter Duncan, Martina Jotte, Albert Spengel, and Jac. Neumann. Duncan drove the butcher cart, delivering meat cut by Spengel, while Neumann and Jotte handled the fruit and vegetable departments of the store. The barrels in the front contain pickles. File photo

“When the United States entered World War I in 1917, the United States groups gave their full support to the war effort… Now that the war was over and peace talks were proceeding in Paris, a group was also meeting in Boston to organize the League to Enforce the Peace. This league had significant influence on President Woodrow Wilson, as he joined the cause, which later became the League of Nations.

“By May 1919, the Unites States, Britain and France had agreed on the peace terms to be communicated to Germany. The German government was outraged and initially refused to sign the treaty. However, the continuing Allied naval blockade and Allied threats of force left Germany with little choice… Germany would be starved into submission, unless it acquiesced. So, on June 28, 1919, Herman Muller and Johannes Bell of the new German republican government signed the Treaty of Versailles. (History of World War I by Marshall Cavendish from Louis Latzer Memorial Public Library.)

The book Pass in Review, which was written Pvt. Allan C. Huber and documents Highland residents’ contributions to the war effort, has seven Hubers in it. Four saw action in World War I. Carl and Henry Huber were in training in France when the Armistice was signed, and Eugene was stationed at Camp Haiti and then Guantanamo, Cuba for guard duty.

Pvt. Allan C. Huber, 28, the son of Mrs. Mary A. Huber, enlisted June 4, 1917 in St. Louis. He was sent to Fort Sill, Okla., and was assigned to Co. K, 138th Regiment, 35th Division. Allan landed in England on May 2, 1918 and was under English Army instructions for five weeks, then saw action in France at Hilsenfirst, Vosges Mountains, July 11-19; St. Mihiel, Sept. 11-18 and with American offensive at Meuse-Argonne, Vauquois Hill, Cheppy and Exermont, Sept. 26 to Oct.1, 1918; then Sommedieu sector, Oct. to Nov. 11. He was in the Army of Occupation and was discharged May 12, 1919.

Allan’s brother, Pvt. Harry J. Huber, also age 28, was called Feb. 23, 1918. Harry was assigned to Co. F, 335th Infantry, 84th Division and was in France in September 1918. He saw action with the machine gun company of 361st Infantry, 91st Division at Revigny, France. He was in the Army of Occupation and was discharged April 29, 1919.

Carl R. Huber, a musician third class, 28, the son of Mrs. Adam Huber, was called May 25, 1918 and sent to Camp Shelby, Miss. Carl was assigned to the headquarters company of the 151st Infantry, 38th Division Band. He was in France for further training by Oct. 17, 1918. He was in the Army of Occupation at Coblenz, Germany and was discharged August 14, 1919

Pvt. Clarence E. Huber, 22, and his brother, Cpl. William F. Huber, also sons of Mrs. Adam Huber, were both called Feb. 23, 1918 and both sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky., but here went different ways.

Clarence was assigned to 17th Co., 159th Depot Brigade, then transferred to Co. F, 335th Infantry, 84th Division. Clarence arrived in France and saw action at the American Meuse-Argonne offensive Oct. 31- Nov. 11. Clarence was in the Army of Occupation and discharged June 10, 1919.

Cpl. William F. Huber, 26, was assigned to Co. B, 309th Engineers, and sent to Camp Mills, Ohio, then to France on Sept. 26. During his nine months overseas, his unit did construction engineering in different parts of France. William was discharged June 20, 1919.

Mess Sgt. Eugene J. Huber, 23, the son of Sam Huber, enlisted in the U.S. Marines on Oct. 14, 1916 and was sent to Paris Island, S.C., for training and assigned to 54th Co, 2nd Regiment, 1st Brigade. Eugene was sent to Guantanamo, Cuba, and Camp Haiti, where his unit was serving guard duty, and he was still serving the rest of his enlistment, when Pass in Review was printed…

Eugene’s younger brother, Cpl. Henry L. Huber, 23, was assigned to Headquarters Co., 139th Field Artillery, 38th Division at Camp Shelby, Miss. He arrived in France on Oct. 21 and was in training at LeMans, France, when the Armistice was signed. He was discharged Feb. 19, 1919.

“Sgt. Oscar J. Hug, 23, son of Jacob Hug, was called Sept. 19, 1917 and sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky., and assigned to Co. B, 333rd Infantry, 84th Division. Oscar then did convoy work until September 1918, then was moved to France on Oct. 10, 1918 and was discharged Aug. 18, 1919.

“Joseph Hunsdoerfer, 30, the son of Anton Hunsdoerfer, was called Sept. 19, 1917 and sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky., and assigned to Co. A, 333rd Infantry, 84th Division, as cook. He arrived in France on Sept. 11, 1918 and was in training in France when the Armistice was signed. Joseph was discharged July 12, 1919.

“Pvt. Eugene J. Iberg, 21, the son of Adolph Iberg, lost his left arm at the shoulder from flying shrapnel. He was sent to Base Hospital No. 114 at Bordeaux, France, then back to the U.S. by hospital ship, and on to Iowa, where he was discharged May 6, 1919. Eugene was at the University of Missouri, studying vocational agriculture on a scholarship provided by the U.S. government for disabled soldiers, when Pass in Review was printed.

“Pvt. John A. Isert, 28, the son of Mrs. Pius Linenfelser, was called Feb. 23, 1918 and sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky. He transferred to Headquarters Co., 141st Field Artillery, 39th Division at Camp Beauregard, La. He arrived in France in September 1918 and was in training until the Armistice. He was in the Army of Occupation and discharged May 1, 1919.

“Pvt. Milton W. Jost, 20, the son of Mrs. Minnie Jost, enlisted May 1, 1918 and was transferred to Fort Benjamin Harrison, Ind., and was assigned to the Medical Detachment, 60th Engineers and sent to France in July 1918. While in France, he was reassigned to the 103rd Transportation Corps for the purpose of transporting troops, ammunition and supplies. He was discharged July 10, 1919.

“Milton’s older brother, Sgt. Wilbert J. Jost, 22, was called Sept. 18, 1917 and sent to Camp Custer, Mich. He was assigned to Battery E, 328th Field Artillery, 85th Division. He arrived in France in August 1918 and saw action on Toul sector, Nov. 1-11. He was discharged on April 25, 1919.

“Pvt. Lawrence Holzinger, 30, the son of Mrs. Louise Willman Holzinger, was sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky., and assigned to Co. 17, 159th Depot Brigade, then transferred to Co. F, 335th Infantry, 84th Division and sent to France in September 1918. He saw action on the Lys-Scheldt front near Audenaarde, Belgium. He was in the Army of Occupation in Germany and discharged April 29, 1919.

“Pvt. Alvis E. Jotte, 26, the son of Mrs. Theodore Jotte, was called Feb. 23, 1918 and sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky. and assigned to Co. B, 335th Infantry, 84th Division. He arrived in France in September 1918 and saw action at Lys-Scheldt front in Belgium, near Audenaarde. He was discharged April 29, 1919.”

Alvis returned to Highland and had a fruit and vegetable market at 818 Main St. for almost 10 years before he died in 1928. It was in the former Suppiger Brothers Shoe Store building. I will have a photo in the “J” section of the Highland Home Museum, which is scheduled to open in December, of Jotte’s Market, when his mother, Martina Jotte was running the market in 1915. Also a photo of Suppiger Brothers Shoe Store, in this same building, in our “S” section of the Museum.

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