Highland News Leader

Highland man received scholarship to U of I after losing arm in WWI

“Post-war Germany boundaries were 13 percent smaller, with much of the east being returned to Poland, plus the river port of Posen on the Baltic Sea; also the part of Prussia, making the Polish Corridor, and the river port on the Baltic Sea of Memel to Lithuania and northern Schleswig to Denmark, with many small areas given to other Allies.

“Colonial Germany all had new owners. Much of it became mandate territory of the League of Nations. German East Africa became Tanzania and went to Britain. German Southwest Africa went to South Africa, and the small land locked area of Rwanda-Urundi passed to Belgium. German New Guinea in the South Pacific, went to Australia, while the smaller islands were distributed to New Zealand, Australia and Britain. Northern Pacific Islands and the China base were given to Japan. Germany also had to pay $5 billion immediately and $32 billion in gold in the next decade, as the Allies needed capital to pay their own huge war debts, caused by Germany.” (History of World War I by Marshall Cavendish from Louis Latzer Memorial Public Library.)

Now, back to Pass in Review by Pvt. Allan C. Huber.

“Pvt. George F. Kantner, 26, the son of Mrs. Mary Kantner, was called Oct. 3, 1917 and was sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky., and assigned to Co. A, 333rd Infantry, 84th Division. He saw action in Chateau Thierry sector in June 1918, then Meuse-Argonne offensive. He was wounded in the head on Oct. 28, 1918 and sent to three base hospitals, then finally to Brest, France, hospital center. As a wounded war veteran and hospital patient, Kantner arrived in the U.S. on Feb. 12, 1919 and remained hospitalized until his discharge on March 1, 1919.

“George’s brother, Pvt. Theodore F. Kantner, 25, was called on May 25, 1918 and landed in France on Sept. 20, but he did not see action. He was in the Army of Occupation near Coblenz, Germany, and was discharged Aug. 13, 1919.

“Pvt. Henry E. Kantner,e 25, son of John Kantner, was called Feb. 23, 1918 and sent to Camp Zachery Taylor, Ky., and assigned to Co. F, 335th Infantry, 84th Division. He arrived in France on Sept. 20 and was reassigned to the 91st Division and saw action on the Lys-Scheldt sector, Flanders front in Belgium, near Audenaarde, Oct.31-Nov. 11, 1918. He was discharged on April 28, 1919.

“Pvt. Robert Kehrli, 30, the son of Mrs. Caroline Kehrli, was called June 24, 1918 and sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky. He was transferred to Co. 13, 159th Depot Brigade and later to Co. A, 125th Infantry, 32nd Division and was in France by August and saw action at the Meuse-Argonne offensive in September and October 1918. He was then was in the Army of Occupation at Gillsheim, Germany. He was discharged May 24, 1919.

“Pvt. Albert H. Klaus, 25, the son of Herman Klaus, was called Sept. 19, 1917 and sent to Camp Zachery Taylor, Ky., and assigned to Co. B, 333rd Infantry, 84th Division. By late May, he was in France, had two months of British instruction and then saw action by June 1918 at Somme, Verdun, Troyon, and Meuse until Nov. 11. He was in the Army of Occupation at Burglingster, Luxemberg and was discharged May 31, 1919.

“Pvt. Edward A. Klaus, 28, the son of Edward Klaus Sr., was called April 29, 1918 and sent to Camp Dix, N.J., and was headed for France by July 5. He saw action on Baccarat sector, Meuse-Argonne, then St. Mihiel by Oct. 7 and was gassed on Oct. 15 while in action. He recovered and was discharged June 20, 1919.

“Pvt. Albert L. Knebel, 21, the son of Joseph R. Knebel, was called Sept. 5, 1918 and died Oct. 11, 1918 of double pneumonia at Camp Custer, Mich.

“Pvt. Elmer P. Knebel, 27, the son of Anton Knebel, was called June 24, 1918 and sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky., and assigned to Co. H, 156th Infantry, 39th Division and sailed for France on Aug. 21, 1918 and saw action in the Meuse- Argonne offensive Oct. 20-Nov. 11. He was in the Army of Occupation at Coblenz, Germany, and was discharged Jan. 18, 1919.

“Elmer’s brother, Saddler Osmar J. Knebel, 23, was called Sept. 19, 1917 and sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky., and transferred to the supply company of the 345th Infantry, 87th Division. He was in France by September 1918 and was transporting supplies for his division. He was discharged Jan. 18, 1919.

“Cpl. Leo V. Koch, 22, the son of Frank Koch, was called Oct. 4, 1917 and sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky. He was assigned to Co. E, 132nd Infantry, 84th Division. He landed in France in late May 1918 for instructions by the British, seeing action on the Amies sector, then Verdun by Sept. 8, and then the Meuse-Argonne offensive in October, and St. Mihiel until Nov. 11. He was in the Army of Occupation at Consdorf, Luxenburg, and was discharged May 31, 1919.

“Pvt. Edward W. Kustermann, 25, son of Ambrose Kustermann, was called Sept. 19, 1917 and sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky., and assigned to Co. C, 345th Infantry, 87th Division. He was sent to France where he saw action on the Soissons front April 24, 1918, then Alsace-Lorraine and Chateau Thierry, where on July 22, 1918, he had his arm blown off above the elbow by shrapnel. He was given medical attention, then sent home on a hospital ship on Oct. 10, 1918. He was sent to Des Moines, Iowa, and discharged, Feb. 15, 1919. Under the government plan, Kustermann was fitted, sent to the University of Illinois and was attending agriculture training when Pass in Review was printed.”

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