Highland News Leader

Complications from measles killed one Highland WWI solider

This photo show’s the tombstone of Pvt. Albert Liebler, 1891-1918, at St. Gertrude Catholic Cemetery in Grantfork. Photo by Roland Harris.
This photo show’s the tombstone of Pvt. Albert Liebler, 1891-1918, at St. Gertrude Catholic Cemetery in Grantfork. Photo by Roland Harris. For the News Leader

“The Germans, on June 21, 1919, scuttled their interred war fleet that was at Scapa Flow, in the Orkney Islands, off the northeast coast of Scotland. The German fleet was scuttled by the Germans’ skeleton crews that had been kept on the warships, as the Germany feared the warships would fall permanently into British hands. They acted to prevent this British takeover from happening.

“The demilitarizing and occupation of the German Rhineland, between the Rhine River of Germany and France, plus a 30-mile strip on the east bank of the Rhine, was the most humiliating of the conditions that was in the treaty. The French had wanted a new buffer state between them and Germany, and this was the compromise by the Allies favored by President Wilson.

“The Rhine River area was also out of bounds to German troops, and the German Army was limited to 100,000 voluntary troops. No German air force was allowed, only a small coastal naval force, with submarines specifically banned. All of the treaty would prove a source of grievance that later gave fuel and propaganda opportunities to Adolph Hitler.” (History of World War I, by Marshall Cavendish, from Louis Latzer Memorial Public Library.)

Now, back to Pass in Review by Pvt. Allan C. Huber.

“Pvt. Jacob Landert Jr., 31, the son of Jacob Landolt Sr., was called Sept. 5, 1917 and sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky. He was assigned to Co. A, 333rd Infantry, 84th Division. In May 1918, he was in France and under English instructions for two months and then saw service on the Amiens sector, Alberts front; the Verdun sector, west of Meuse, on Sept. 8, 1918; and the Meuse-Argonne offensive with the American troops until October; then Troyon-Sur-Meuse until Nov. 11. Landert was in the Army of Occupation at Burglingster, Luxemburg, and was discharged May 31, 1919

“Pvt. Henry C. Landmann, 27, son of Henry Landmann, was called May 24, 1918 and sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky. He was sent to France in late August 1918 and transferred to Co. C, 128th Infantry, 32nd Division and saw action in the Meuse-Argonne offensive, Oct. 23- Nov. 11, 1918. He was in the Army of Occupation at Coblenz, Germany, and was discharged May 19, 1919.

“Pvt. Emil A. Landolt, 27, son of Adolph Landolt, was called Sept. 19, 1917 and was sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky., and was assigned to Co. C, 333rd Infantry, 84th Division. He was in France by September 1918 and transferred to Co. C of the 128th Infantry, 33rd Division, and saw action in the Meuse-Argonne offensive, Oct. 23-Nov. 11. He was discharged May 19, 1919.

“Pvt. John A. Landolt, 23, son of Sam Landolt, was called June 24, 1918 and sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky. He was in France by late August and transferred to Co. C, 314th Ammunition Train, 89th Division and saw action at St. Mihiel and in the Meuse-Argonne offensive until Nov. 11. He was discharged June 2, 1919.

“Pvt. Edward R. Leder, 22, son of Jacob Leder, was called Feb. 23, 1918 and sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky., and assigned to Co. H, 335th Infantry, 84th Division. By September, he was in Mussidan, France, and transferred to Co. A, 26th Infantry, 1st Division. He saw action in the Meuse-Argonne offensive in October and Sedan front until Nov. 11. He was in the Army of Occupation at Montabauer, Germany, and was discharged Sept. 26, 1919.

“Pvt. Calvin J. Lee, 24, the son of William H. Lee, was called Sept. 19, 1917 and was sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky., and assigned to Co. B, 333rd Infantry, 84th Division. While in camp, he contacted measles, which developed into pneumonia, of which he died Jan. 9, 1918.

“Pvt. Oliver W Lee, 23, son of Charles Lee, was called Feb. 23, 1918 and sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky., and assigned to Co. H, 335th Infantry, 84th Division. He crossed into France and was sent to Mussidan, France, and transferred as a regimental orderly at LeMans, France. He was discharged July 25, 1919.

“Pvt. Ferd Leriche, 23, the son of Mrs. Laura Leriche, was called June 26, 1918 and sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky., and assigned to Co. K, 126th Infantry, 39th Division at Camp Beauregard, La. He was in France by Aug. 18 and transferred to the 32nd Division. He took part in the Meuse-Argonne offensive from September to Nov. 11, 1918.

“Ferd’s older brother, Willis Leriche, 26, had enlisted and was sent to 2nd Officer Training School, Field Artillery at Fort Sheridan, Ill., on Aug. 27, 1917. He became a 1st lieutenant and sailed on Dec. 24, 1917 and crossed into France. He served as a 1st lieutenant with Battery F, 5th Field Artillery, 1st Division. He became a field artillery instructor and battery officer and saw service in the Meuse-Argonne offensive, October to Nov. 11. He was in the Army of Occupation at Coblenz, Germany, and was discharged April 16, 1919.”

Pvt. Albert Liebler, 1891-1918, was not in the book, Pass in Review, but I have his soldier/tombstone photo, which is with this column. Liebler was with the 159th Infantry and died April 4, 1918. (If you have additional information, please send, and I will use it in a future column and add it to my book, that I have from Msgr. William Whalen and the book that I have given to the Highland Home Museum from Carl Siegrist.)

“Wagoner William H Lorenz, 31, son of Edward Lorenz, was called May 25, 1918 and sent to Camp Cody, N.M., where he was assigned as a wagoner for the supply company of the 134th Infantry, 34th Division. He was in France by August 1918 and saw service with the 329th Infantry, 83rd Division and was discharged Feb. 14, 1919.

“Cpl. Clarence O. Lory, 18, son of Henry Lory, enlisted May 29, 1917 and was trained at Fort Bliss, Texas, in Field Artillery Supply Co., 5th Field Artillery of the 1st Division. He was in France by Aug. 13, 1917 and saw action in November 1917 with the French at Luneville; then Toul, January to April 1918; Montdidier-Noyon, May-July; Aisne-Marne, August; St. Mihiel, September; and with the American offensive at Meuse-Argonne, Oct. 1-Nov. 11, 1918; then the Army of Occupation at Neuhausel, Germany, and he was discharged Sept. 27, 1919.

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