Highland News Leader

Highland soldiers fought out the final days of World War I

Pvt. Robert O. Wasserfall in his World War I uniform. The photo from his niece, the later Doris Zimmermann (Mrs. Milton) Bieser. Robert’s photo and the Wasserfall family farm pictures will also be in the new Highland Home Museum’s “North Farm Room,” when that section is completed.
Pvt. Robert O. Wasserfall in his World War I uniform. The photo from his niece, the later Doris Zimmermann (Mrs. Milton) Bieser. Robert’s photo and the Wasserfall family farm pictures will also be in the new Highland Home Museum’s “North Farm Room,” when that section is completed.

Highland Home, 1600 Walnut, welcomes you to our first annual Nativity Festival on Sunday, Dec. 4 from 1 to 4 p.m., where there will be a display of Christmas Nativity sets, on loan from residents, families and friends of the Highland Home. Don’t forget, admission is free, and refreshments will be served. Also, one room of the Highland Home Museum will be open, as well as the south Art Hall. We will probably have more than 2,000 items in the museum, when completed. Come check out the progress.

Now, back to World War I.

“Turkey was the last border to be resolved. Turkey was decimated by the Treaty of Sevres on Aug. 20, 1920. With the exception of the issue of reparations, Turkey was in many ways treated more harshly than Germany. Turkey suffered the loss of its vast Middle East Empire… The province of Hejaz (now a part of Saudi Arabia) became independent, also the new countries of Syria and Lebanon, became mandates of the League of Nations, under French control… Transjordan (now Jordan, again), plus Iraq and Palestine, also became League of Nations mandates, under British control. Istanbul had a French-British force of occupation, and Turkey had League of Nations administration of Turkey’s Dardanelles Straits, as a neutral zone… Turkey also lost two islands, Rhodes and Dodecanese, to Italy. (Quotes from History of World War I by Marshall Cavendish, from Louis Latzer Memorial Public Library.)

Now, we will continue with Pass in Review by Pvt. Allan C. Huber.

“Pvt. George D. Suppiger, 20, the son of Edward Suppiger, enlisted June 24, 1918 at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., and was transferred to Fort Sheridan, Ill. He was in France by Sept. 3, 1918 with the Evacuation Hospital No. 10, stationed at Rimacourt, and then Froidos, for 10 months. He was then with Base Hospital No. 117 at La Foch for six months. He was discharged June 16, 1919.

“Pvt. Nick Trautner, 27, the son of Barney Trautner Sr., was called Sept. 19, 1917 and sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, assigned to Machine Gun School, 333rd Infantry, 84th Division. He transferred to a machine gun company with the 129th Infantry, 33rd Division, and was in France by May 23, 1918. He was under British instruction for five weeks at Alberts, France, then saw action at Hill 304 on the Verdun Sector until Oct. 6, 1918, when he was overcome by gas, spending one month in Base Hospital No. 60. He was able to rejoin his unit in the Army of Occupation at Ettelbroeck, Luxemburg, and was discharged June 29, 1919.

“Pvt. Edmund Tremmel, 28, son of Ferd Tremmel Sr., was called June 29, 1918 and sent to Camp Dix, N.J., then transferred to Co. C, 603rd Engineers at Fort Benjamin Harrison, Ind. In September 1918, he arrived in France and saw action in the Meuse-Argonne, an American offensive, from Oct. 23 to Nov. 11. He was discharged June 29, 1919.

“Edmund’s younger brother, Oliver W. Tremmel was known as ‘Kibble’ when he played baseball and worked at the shoe factory in Highland. Kibble was called April 29, 1918 and was sent to Camp Dix, N.J., then transferred to Co. F, 147th Infantry, 37th Division and was in France by July 1918 and saw action on Baccarat sector, Sept. 6-16, and the Avacourt sector, Sept. 21-25. He was then with the American offensive at Meuse-Argonne, Sept. 26- Oct. 1; Pannes sector, Oct. 7-16; then the Ypres-Lys offensive, Oct. 31 to Nov. 4 and Nov. 9-11. He was in the Army of Occupation and discharged April 13, 1919.”

Leroy Troutt was in my column of Aug. 10, 2016.

Charles Ulmet was wounded and gassed. He was in my column of Aug. 17, 2016.

Orville Utzinger was in my column of Aug. 10, 2016.

Robert Vaupel, Anton Voegele and Nelson Walter were all in my column of Aug. 31, 2016.)

“Pvt. Robert O. Wasserfall, 29, the son of Fred Wasserfall, was called May 25, 1918. He was sent to Camp Shelby, Miss., and assigned to Battery A, 139th Field Artillery, 38th Division. He was in France by October, in a French training camp, but didn’t get into action. He was discharged Jan. 15, 1919. (Robert’s is photo in today’s column.)

“Pvt. Leo S. Weindel, 22, son of Leo Weindel, was called May 24, 1918 and sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky., and assigned to Co. M, 159th Depot Brigade. He was then to Co. M, 156th Infantry, 39th Division at Camp Beauregard, La., and arrived in France in early September. He saw action in the American offensive at Meuse-Argonne in October to Nov. 11. He was in the Army of Occupation at Rossbach, Germany, and was discharged May 18, 1919.”

I have the Camp Zachary Taylor Pictorial Review book from Carl Siegrist. The big, green book will be in the book file at the Highland Home Museum. If you had relatives who were in World War I and at Camp Zachary Taylor, you may find their photo with their company group. We, hopefully, will have the Highland Home Museum “Grand Opening” later this winter or early spring.

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