Highland News Leader

Benedict Zobrist hunted German U-boats during World War I

Highland World War I veterans pose for a photo. In back from left are Ed. R. Leder, (first name unknown) Loyet, and Edmund Matter. In front is Cy Hirschi. The photo is believed to have been taken when all four men were assigned to Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky.
Highland World War I veterans pose for a photo. In back from left are Ed. R. Leder, (first name unknown) Loyet, and Edmund Matter. In front is Cy Hirschi. The photo is believed to have been taken when all four men were assigned to Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky. Courtesy photo

“The League of Nations first session took place in Geneva, Switzerland on Nov. 15, 1920. The League of Nations had many problems. It was established to be the crowning achievement of Peace ... The League was left without the most powerful nation, the United States ... The new two powerful nations of Germany and the Soviet Union were not members. This situation created a fundamental weakness in the League of Nations from the outset ... Britain and France needed to take control, but both had been weakened by the war.

“There were other crucial flaws. France strongly argued for a League-backed military force, either a standing army or dedicated national contingents under League control. Britain and the United States refused to commit. The result was that, when the League was really needed, in the late 1930s, it lacked the might to act effectively.

“When confronted with powerful countries, first Germany (and its allies), then Italy and Japan, that would not play by the rules, the League was revealed as toothless and spineless ... Japan withdrew from the League in 1933... The League was doomed to ultimate failure but continued its existence until 1940. (Quotes from “History of World War I,” by Marshall Cavendish, from Louis Latzer Memorial Public Library.)

Now back to “Pass in Review,” by Pvt. Allan C. Huber. This the last of European veterans, listed in “Pass in Review.” If you have information about other World War I veterans of the Highland area that were not listed, please get in touch with me at once. Be sure to dial the area code, 618-654-5005.

“Cp. Calvin C. Zilles, 23, the son of Charles Zilles, was called June 24, 1918 and was sent to Camp Zachary Tayor, Ky., then transferred to Co. D, 156th Infantry, 39th Division at Camp Beauregard, La. He was in France by August, and after additional training, he was transferred to railroad transportation and discharged July 26, 1919.

“Pvt. Walter F. Zimmerman, 22, the son of Joseph Zimmermann, was called May 25, 1918 and sent to Camp Shelby, Miss., and assigned to a machine gun company with the 150th Infantry. He was in France by August but was then confined to a hospital. He then went to the Railroad Transportation Service and was discharged July 26, 1919.

“Pvt. William A. Zimmermann, 30, was called April 29, 1918 and sent to Camp Dix, N.J., and transferred to Co. D, 335th Machine Gun Co., 87th Division. In August 1918, he was in France and transferred to Service of Supply Depots and was discharged March 22, 1919.

“Warrant Officer Benedict Zobrist, 21, the son of William Zobrist, enlisted in the U.S. Navy and saw eight years of service at sea. Action during the war was hunting and sinking submarines at sea, aboard the USS Bushnell, a submarine tender. He was discharged on board the USS Zeppelin in New Jefferson Barracks, Mo., as a member of Co. A, 14th Infantry regulars and sent to Fort Seward, Alaska, where he did guard duty on government property. He sailed from Angel Island, Calif., Nov. 15, 1919, serving his period of his enlistment, when (‘Pass in Review’) was printed.

“Pvt. Osmar M. Zobrist, 22, the son of John Zobrist, was called April 29, 1918 and sent to Camp Dix, N.J., and transferred to Camp Lee, Va., to Co. L, later Co. A, 147th Infantry, 37th Division. He landed in France July 5, 1918 and saw action at Meuse-Argonne offensive, September 1918; St. Mihiel sector, October 1918; Ypres-Lys front, Oct. 31 to Nov. 4 and again Nov. 9-11, 1918. He served in the Army of Occupation and was discharged April 13, 1919.

“Sgt. Harry L. Zolk, 20, the son of Frank Zolk, was sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky., and assigned to Co. C, 333rd Infantry, 84th Division. In September, he crossed into France as a duty sergeant. He served in the Army of Occupation and was discharged July 15, 1919.”

The book, “Pass in Review” was first given to me by the son of veteran Carl Seigrist, and I will be giving it to the Highland Home Museum in Carl’s memory. Later, I had the same book given to me by Msgr. William Whalen, and I will be keeping it in my files in our apartment here at the Highland Home.

If you have been raised on a farm, or your family had a Highland-area farm, and you have photos, we will have room for these photos framed for the Highland Home Museum. We are also looking for small farm items, such as milk cans with names, milk stool, etc. We have just received the Tontz Spinning wheel, the Wenger milk maid yolk, and the Erwin Bircher egg crate, with all of the fillers. Space should be available at least until the end of the year.

If you have any type of art work, we still have room in the North Hall. Paintings, photos, sewing, wood carving, wood working or framing are all being sought.

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