Highland News Leader

A final look at the Highland soldiers of World War I

Pvt. Paul Ambuehl during World War I. The photo is from his nephew, the late Earl Duncan.
Pvt. Paul Ambuehl during World War I. The photo is from his nephew, the late Earl Duncan. Courtesy photo

I will finish the book, Pass in Review by Pvt. Allan C. Huber.

I will return to the “A’s,” starting with Ambuehl, Pvt. Paul, age 31, the son of Mrs. Rose Ambuehl. He was called April 29, 1918, and sent to Camp Dix, New Jersey, and assigned to Medical Corps Hospital Centers. He sailed on Sept. 13, 1918, for the Brest, France, hospital centers and was transferred to Base Hospital No. 94 at Gievres. He remained there for 12 months and was then discharged Sept. 20, 1919.

Apken, Pvt. John H., age 26, the son of Herman Apken, was called June 24, 1918, and he was sent to France on Aug.16, 1918, then to French training and was transferred to Co. A, 125th Infantry, 32nd Division and was in the Army of Occupation near Coblenz, Germany, and was discharged June 1, 1919.

Augustine, Pvt. Otto P., age 23, son of Otto Augustin, was called June 23, 1918, and sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Kentucky, and assigned to 13th Veterinary Hospital Unit at Camp Lee, Va. He sailed for Brest, France, on Oct. 28, 1918, and the war ended Nov. 11. He helped with the horses and was discharged April 19, 1919.

Baumann, Cpl. Arnold R., age 23, the son of Christ Baumann, was called Feb. 23, 1918, and sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Kentucky, to Co. G, 335th Infantry, 84th Division; then to Camp Sherman, Ohio, and transferred to Co. A, 309th Ammunition Train, arriving in France on Oct. 29 and camp near Bordeaux. He was discharged Feb. 9, 1919.

Becker, Pvt. Leonard F., age 24, son of Henry Becker, was called Sept. 19, 1917, and sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky. and assigned to Co. B, 333rd Infantry, 84th Division; then sent to Camp Logan, Texas, and assigned to Co. E, 132nd Infantry, 33rd Division. He was in France by August. He saw action on Amiens and Verdun sectors by Sept. 8, 1918, and Meuse-Argonne offensive late August until Oct. 9, when he made the supreme sacrifice, being killed by artillery fire while in action in the Argonne offensive.

Bircher, Sgt. Leroy, age 18, son of Jule Bircher, enlisted April 19, 1915, at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri, and was sent to Fort Leavenworth, Kan. He was assigned to Troop H, 15th U.S. Cavalry from September 1915 to February 1917. He transferred to U.S. Pack Train No. 303. He sailed to Brest, France, in June 1918 and was sent to St. Nazaire, France, as a horseshoer for Pack Train No. 23. He was discharged Dec. 10, 1919, and re-enlisted in the Quartermaster Corps, where he was serving when Pass in Review was printed.

Bircher, Cpl. Oscar H., age 26, the son of August Bircher, was called Sept. 19, 1917, and sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Kentucky, and assigned to Co. D, 345th Infantry, 7th Division at Camp Pike, Ark. By Sept. 11, 1918, they were in France for further training. He was discharged Jan. 19, 1919.

“Bleisch, Sgt. Roland J., age 23, son of Jacob Bleisch, enlisted June 5, 1917, at East St. Louis and was sent to Fort Sam Houston, Texas, and assigned to Quartermaster Corps. On July 26, 1917, he set sail for France. He served in many different bases in France. He was discharged May 28, 1919.

Roland Bleisch’s older brother, Pvt. Selmar A. Bleisch, age 27, enlisted in the Signal Enlisted Reserve Corps in St. Louis in October 1917. He was called Feb. 23, 1918, and sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Kentucky, and assigned to 309th Signal Battalion, 3rd Division, and crossed into Cherbourg, France. He was in many bases in France, but he saw no direct action and later was with the Army of Occupation at Andernach, Germany. He then transferred to the Sarborme University Detachment in Paris, where he studied for four months. He was discharged Sept. 27, 1919.

Bosshart, Pvt. Walter H., age 22, the son of Mrs. Christina Bosshart, was called Oct. 3, 1917, and sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Kentucky, and assigned to Co. B, 333rd Infantry, 84th Division. He then transferred to 328th Motor Transport Corps at Camp Meigs, Washington, D.C. He was in France by Feb. 2, 1918, and he did blacksmithing work with his unit. He was discharged Sept. 22, 1919.

Bryan, Pvt. Homer L., age 25, the son of Elmer Bryan, was called Sept. 5, 1917, and sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Kentucky, where he was assigned to Co. B, 333rd Infantry, 84th Division and later was transferred to their machine gun company. He was in France by September 1918 for additional training and transferred to 323rd Machine Gun Battalion, 83rd Division. After the war, he was transferred to Provisional Supply Company at Montsurs, France, and was discharged, Sept. 28, 1919. He had two other brothers in service, but neither were in France.

Buchheim, Pvt. Oscar J., age 22, son of Mrs. Pauline Buchheim was called May 25, 1918, and sent to Camp Shelby, Mississippi, and assigned to Co. D, 139th Machine Gun Battalion, 38th Division. He was in France by October 1918, was in the Army of Occupation and discharged May 24, 1919.

Buehlmann, Arthur H., age 26, the son of F.J. Buehlmann of St. Jacob, was called Oct. 3, 1917, and sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Kentucky, and assigned to Co. A, 333rd Infantry, 84th Division. He was a musician and was assigned to the band. He crossed into France in late September and was transferred to 4th Division Band. He was in the Army of Occupation at Coblenz, Germany, and discharged Aug. 4, 1919.

Ellis, Pvt. Charles A., age 26 the son of Mrs. Charles Ellis, was called Feb. 23, 1918, and sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Kentucky, and assigned to Co. E, 335th Infantry, 84th Division. Later, he was with the headquarters company signal platoon. He crossed into France on Sept. 22, 1918. He saw action with the 1st Division in Meuse-Argonne offensive in October, then Sedan front until Nov. 11. He was in the Army of Occupation at several German areas and was discharged Sept. 29, 1919.

Fetterer, Pvt. J.A., age 25, the son of Oswald Fetterer, was called May 27, 1918, and sent to Camp Shelby, Mississippi, and assigned to the machine gun company of the 327th Infantry 82nd Division. In October, he crossed into France and served in the American Expeditionary Force from Oct. 5, 1918, to Nov. 11. He was then in the Army of Occupation. He was discharged May 27, 1919.

Klaus, Pvt. Emil F., age 24, the son of Adam Klaus, was called May 25, 1918, and sent to Camp Shelby, Mississippi, and assigned to Co. B, 149th Infantry, 38th Division. He crossed into France on Oct. 11, 1918, and he was in training. He was discharged March 1, 1919.

Knebel, Osmar J., age 23, the son of Anton Knebel, was called Sept. 19, 1917, and sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Kentucky, then transferred to Camp Pike, Arkansas, to the supply company of the 345th Infantry, 87th Division. He was in France by September 1918, transporting of supplies to the troops. He was discharged Jan. 18, 1919.

This completes my World War I columns, unless I receive additional information from my readers. Thanks.

(It was Sgt. Raymond Wenger’s family that had the hand-carved, walnut “milkmaid’s milk carrier” that has been given by Del Beckman to the Highland Home Museum and may be the second- or third-oldest item that we have in the museum, as we also have the Tontz handmade spinning wheel from great-great-granddaughter Muriel Schrumpf Brockmeier, which has been given to the Highland Home Museum. I think the oldest item is the hand-hewed brace beam from the Suppiger Swiss residence/barn that the Highland Historical Society was trying to restore in 1971. The Roman numeral “V” brace beam was cut in 1832 and used in the barn/residence, which was finished in 1833. The barn was being restored in December 1971 when a tornado completely demolished the building. We have this brace beam in the south, Art Hall, along with the painting of the Suppiger barn, which I made in 1990-something.)

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