O'Fallon Progress

Shiloh paves way for new road rating system

Karzan Bahaaldin, project engineer with Thouvenot, Wade & Moerchen Inc. stands to give a presentation about the benefits of a Pavement Management program and a Geographic Information System (GIS) database on Monday (May 23) at the Village Board of Trustees Committee at Large meeting in Village Hall at One Park Drive in Shiloh. From left sits, Village Public Works Director Megan Fuhler and Village Administrator John Marquart and, far right, Trustee Mark Kurtz.
Karzan Bahaaldin, project engineer with Thouvenot, Wade & Moerchen Inc. stands to give a presentation about the benefits of a Pavement Management program and a Geographic Information System (GIS) database on Monday (May 23) at the Village Board of Trustees Committee at Large meeting in Village Hall at One Park Drive in Shiloh. From left sits, Village Public Works Director Megan Fuhler and Village Administrator John Marquart and, far right, Trustee Mark Kurtz. rkirsch@bnd.com

The Village of Shiloh will spend over $185,000 for a five-year pavement management System (PMS), which is closely intertwined with an ongoing Geographic Information System (GIS) project.

The village has hired Thouvenot, Wade & Moerchen Inc., (TWM) a Swansea based engineering group for both projects.

There are over 100 miles of roadways in the village.

Village staff and TWM are conducting a one-time on-site evaluations to rate all of its streets.

The village’s current system is outdated, takes too long and ends up costing the village tons of money annually, according to John Marquart, village administrator.

The Shiloh Village Board on Monday authorized Shiloh Mayor Jim Vernier to sign both contracts, costing a combined $187,000.

TWM is expected to provide the village with a five-year period for GIS database, cloud hosting, and PMS.

The village will pay $37,000 TWM for the next five years starting now, and a one time $8,000 fee to cover the hosting creation and set up.

The cost of the Apple iPads will be a seperate cost depending on if they buy them from TWM at about $1,000 per device, or outsource to another company for a lower price.

The Shiloh budget has a line item in the budget alotting $20-$25,000 for both projects. Village Administrator John Marquart said the village make up the difference with some modifications to the budget.

Every year thereafter, the village expects to pay about $3,000 for hosting and maintenance of the GIS program and the $37,000 for the PMS annually.

“The data has been hosted in several different locations and in different forms. The objective is to bring it all together, finish the project and give the village a GIS data base that can actually be used by the staff,” Marquart said.

PMS is a cost effective strategy to evaluate and rank pre-existing pavement, and can help also predict pavement conditions, according to Karzan Bahaaldin, TWM project engineer.

With the industry trend focusing on the degrading of pavement and budget issues, many trustees asked, ‘why pavement management?’

Bahaaldin said, “It’s simple. It tells us how much, when and where needs to be addressed efficiently and effectively.”

“A pavement management program is a system that evaluates the current status of street pavement (both asphalt and concrete) using field inspection of the pavement and using the criteria as specified in construction and engineering standards,” Marquart stated in a May 13 memorandum to Vernier, the Board of Trustees, Village Clerk Brenda Kern and Treasurer Bill Boker.

The PSM program allows for data input, and then various factors like weather, time, materials under pavement and traffic are then factored in and projected with a recommendation.

“But to get to the recommendation, we need to look at what we call the pavement condition index,” Bahaaldin said.

The pavement condition index wilI look at the distress type, quanity and severity that will then relate to a rating system scaling from zero percent, which is red or poor, to 100, which is green or good, and from 55 to 70 percent is considered yellow or fair.

This takes the subjectivity out of determining what streets are repaired and when, makes the determination objective, Marquart said.

Resident of Innsbruck Estates Lynn Schaefer has lived on Innsbruck for about seven years now, and said she thinks the PMS project is a good idea.

“Bring on the road work,” Schafer said. “It’s just horrible here, and everytime it rains our inlets get flooded, but when the water runs off the nails and screws and debris from get caught in all the cracks and broken parts along the pavement,” Schaefer said.

Vernier said at a recent committee meeting that Innsbruck was annexed in many, many years ago and is not a product of village work, but does need to be resurfaced because it hasn’t ever been fixed. Village staff confirmed Innsbruck is one of the roadways programmed to be done very soon.

Roadway Inventory

The first step in designing a pavement management process is to define the roadway network. A roadway network is comprised of an inventory of the physical characteristics of the roadways being managed.

▪ Pavement surface type: hot-mix asphalt or portland cement concrete

▪ Pavement structure: pavement materials or thickness 

▪ Construction history: different construction periods, different contractors or different materials and techniques

▪ Roadway geometry: number of traffic lanes

▪ Traffic: volume or patterns

▪ Pavement condition: significant variation in condition that is not simply an isolated area 

▪ Geographic boundaries: intersections, bridges, waterways, jurisdiction limits and/or railroad crossings

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