Scott Air Force Base News

Wedemeyer to serve as Scott’s ‘Face-of-Safety’

Kevin Wedemeyer is Scott’s first “Face-of-Safety.” He works for the United States Department of Agriculture, Animal Plant Health Inspection Service and Wildlife Services as a wildlife specialist.
Kevin Wedemeyer is Scott’s first “Face-of-Safety.” He works for the United States Department of Agriculture, Animal Plant Health Inspection Service and Wildlife Services as a wildlife specialist.

The 375th Air Mobility Wing Safety Office proudly presents Scott Air Force Base’s first “Face-of-Safety”—Kevin Wedemeyer.

Wedemeyer works for the United States Department of Agriculture, Animal Plant Health Inspection Service, and Wildlife Services as a wildlife specialist.

He has assisted the wing flight safety office with implementation of the Bird/Wildlife Aircraft Strike Hazard program since 2013.

Wedemeyer’s official job description involves managing wildlife conflicts on Scott AFB, including the dispersal of birds from the airport, recommendations for habitat modification, installation of exclusion devices, raptor trapping and relocation, trapping and euthanizing mammals which may pose threats to aviation safety, collecting data for continued wildlife hazard assessment, and providing reports to the wing safety office as required or requested.

This requires consistent coordination between the safety office, airfield management, and civil engineering.

As a Wildlife Specialist, the daily functions and services he performs provide a direct impact to the successful execution of not only the 375th Operations Group mission, but also the wing’s mission. His expertise in this position allows for creative methods and various mediums to perform his duties.

Wedemeyer’s efforts are quantifiable through the reduction of wildlife aviation threats to military and transient aircraft. As a wildlife specialist, the daily functions and services he performs provide a direct impact to the successful execution of not only the 375th Operations Group mission, but also the wing’s mission. His expertise in this position allows for creative methods and various mediums to perform his duties.

Habitat modification and exclusion are the most effective methods to reduce the number of wildlife aviation hazards on base. Over the past two years, Scott AFB has seen 75 percent reduction in targeted species affected by the taxiway golf bridge netting project headed by Wedemeyer.

According to Wedemeyer, “If the reason for the animals to be on base is removed, they will relocate elsewhere and therefore reduce the threat they pose.”

Harassment through the use of pyrotechnics and other devices is also an effective method he employs to remove immediate threats observed on the airfield. Additionally, trapping and relocating raptors (hawks and owls) is utilized to reduce the number of resident birds of prey that pose a significant threat to the flying mission. He displays his dedication daily to ensuring safe operations and to safeguard Scott AFB personnel and assets from a constantly changing threat.

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