Scott Air Force Base News

The ins, outs and dangers of smoking cigarettes

Smoking is a leading cause of cancer and death from cancer. It causes cancers of the lung, esophagus, larynx, mouth, throat, kidney, bladder, liver, pancreas, stomach, cervix, colon, and rectum.

Along with cancer, smoking causes many other diseases or illnesses such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart disease, strokes, diabetes, and cataracts, just to name a few. In fact, more than 16 million people already have at least one disease from smoking.

Cigarettes contain about 400 chemicals and at least 50 are cancer causing. Think of all of the chemicals under a bathroom or kitchen sink and in a garage. Chemicals such as nail polish remover, ammonia (toilet cleaner), arsenic (poison), methane (sewer gas), butane (lighter fluid), and cadmium (batteries) are all found in cigarettes.

Chemicals such as nail polish remover, ammonia (toilet cleaner), arsenic (poison), methane (sewer gas), butane (lighter fluid), and cadmium (batteries) are all found in cigarettes. These harmful toxins getting into the smoker’s body, as well as the bodies of family, friends, children, and pets.

These harmful toxins getting into the smoker’s body, as well as the bodies of family, friends, children, and pets.

Not surprisingly, secondhand smoking is just as bad for a person. Many people don’t think about the harm they are causing their family, children, and even pets.

A pet is just as likely to become addicted from the nicotine as any other person ... so next time someone is outside smoking with their pets or children, help make them aware that they could be causing a nonsmoker to develop some of the same diseases and that they are 20-30 percent more likely to develop lung cancer.

In addition to the secondhand smoke, people must be cautious of where they are putting those cigarette butts because children and pets will find them. The smallest amount of nicotine can make a child or pet tremendously ill.

For more information, please see the Health Promotion office and attend their tobacco cessation orientation that is offered at 10 a.m. every Tuesday.

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