Scott Air Force Base News

AMC strengthens international partnerships at A/TA symposium

The U.S. and its allies shared ideas to strengthen partnerships during the Airlift/Tanker Association Symposium Oct. 26-29 in Orlando, Fla., building upon the opening address from Gen. David Goldfein, Air Force Chief of Staff.

“We are responsible for projecting power forward with our allies and partners, so if you want to know where I am singularly focused as your chief, it’s three words: joint warfighting excellence,” Goldfein said during his opening speech at A/TA.

We are responsible for projecting power forward with our allies and partners, so if you want to know where I am singularly focused as your chief, it’s three words: joint warfighting excellence.

Gen. David Goldfein, Air Force Chief of Staff

Multiple representatives from allied countries shared their strategies for strengthening U.S. partnerships in the effort for global power projection.

“We should be able to have integrated fleets,” said Royal Australian Air Force Air Commodore Gary Martin, air attaché in Washington, D.C. “And it doesn’t matter about tail flash; it’s just about getting the mission done.”

Martin’s plan to enable integration and assist allies is to look at operational commonalities that spare time and assets.

“Eight years ago (the U.S.) had a doctor on the ice who had appendicitis and had to do a self-operation,” described Martin. “The U.S. had to move an aircraft all the way from Dover (Del.), through Honolulu, and down to New Zealand to get an air drop of the supplies so the doctor could self-medicate and self-operate.

“We can now do that in five hours instead of an entire day just because of a phone call (to Australia).”

In addition to the training opportunities, allied forces also work alongside the U.S. in humanitarian efforts, as seen repeatedly through this hurricane season.

Martin also explained RAAF personnel attend U.S. aeromedical evacuation trainings to have consistent nomenclature and understandings of the latest medical innovations, allowing the two countries to work together seamlessly in real-world operations.

One of these opportunities included Air Mobility Command’s premier exercise Mobility Guardian, which Martin says was an outstanding success for Australia.

In addition to the training opportunities, allied forces also work alongside the U.S. in humanitarian efforts, as seen repeatedly through this hurricane season.

Canada provided one of its C-17 Globemaster III’s in assistance to Puerto Rico, which accounts for 25 percent of their strategic airlift capability, said Royal Canadian Air Force Col. Mark Goulden, 8-Wing Trenton commander.

Likewise, Canada also expressed that their global impact would not be possible without U.S. support.

“We have a very small air mobility capability,” said Goulden. “But one that provides, I believe, a significant impact.”

Canada’s air force has less than 15,000 military personnel, vastly fewer than America’s nearly 500,000 Air Force military force, so when Canada offers its assistance in global missions, it often leans on the U.S. for support.

We have a very small air mobility capability. But one that provides, I believe, a significant impact.

Canadian Air Force Col. Mark Goulden, 8-Wing Trenton commander

“A lot of the operations we participate in we do provide an aircraft, crew, and maintainers; however, we don’t have the logistical support that would enable the operation on our own,” said Goulden. “We conducted operations in central Africa recently.

“We did have crews there but were supported 100 percent logistically by the United States Air Force.

“We see that now in Iraq, so I just want to say thank you to the U.S. for the support in enabling our operations internationally because we would not be able to succeed without you.”

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