Scott Air Force Base News

MONTH OF THE MILITARY FAMILY: Checking in with the Harchaoui triplets

Pictured are the Harchaoui triplets, (from left); Myriam, 436th Supply Chain Operations Squadron at Scott; Rabah, 56th Security Forces Squadron at Luke AFB, Ariz.; and Warda, 60th Medical Operations Squadron at Travis AFB, Calif. All three were born in Algeria before immigrating to the United States, and are Airmen serving in today’s Air Force.
Pictured are the Harchaoui triplets, (from left); Myriam, 436th Supply Chain Operations Squadron at Scott; Rabah, 56th Security Forces Squadron at Luke AFB, Ariz.; and Warda, 60th Medical Operations Squadron at Travis AFB, Calif. All three were born in Algeria before immigrating to the United States, and are Airmen serving in today’s Air Force.

About a year ago, the Harchaoui triplets were featured throughout the Air Force since they had all joined together, and one of them is stationed here.

Airman 1st Class Myriam Harchaoui is assigned to the 436th Supply Chain Operations Squadron and works as a KC-135 Stratotanker sustainment journeyman. Her sister, Warda, is at Travis AFB, Calif., and her brother, Rabah, is assigned to Luke AFB, Ariz.

Most people wouldn’t think we speak every day due to our job schedules—with my sister being a medic and my brother being security forces, but what makes my family so special is we always speak.

Airman 1st Class Myriam Harchaoui, 436th Supply Chain Operations Squadron KC-135 Stratotanker sustainment journeyman

So how are these close-knit triplets doing while serving their country from different points of America?

Myriam said that while hardest adjustment to the military life was being separated from her family and the bond they share, they have adapted and still remain close throughout their enlistment.

“Most people wouldn’t think we speak every day due to our job schedules—with my sister being a medic and my brother being security forces, but what makes my family so special is we always speak,” Myriam said. “Family is very important to us, and we push each other, but it can be hard to do when we aren’t together, so we have to communicate.”

Myriam said that while hardest adjustment to the military life was being separated from her family and the bond they share, they have adapted and still remain close throughout their enlistment.

She said that being a military family means knowing that even though they can’t always be together, her family will still always support her to get through the tough times.

“Having an end goal and knowing this is just temporary is what drives us,” said Myriam. “Doing our best while we our serving together is what gets us through the tough days.”

For their family, being apart is not going to last forever, and that is what helps get them through some of those harder times, she said.

“Families are very considerate of what you go through as a military member and that is very important. Not everyone can adapt to this lifestyle but knowing that your family is willing to is what makes them so special,” Myriam said.

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