Scott Air Force Base News

Scott holds SABC exercise

The 375th Air Mobility Wing conducted a Self Aid and Buddy Care exercise June 21 at Scott Air Force Base. More than 100 members of the wing were evaluated on their ability to use SABC techniques in a variety of situations.
The 375th Air Mobility Wing conducted a Self Aid and Buddy Care exercise June 21 at Scott Air Force Base. More than 100 members of the wing were evaluated on their ability to use SABC techniques in a variety of situations.

The 375th Air Mobility Wing conducted a Self Aid and Buddy Care exercise June 21 at Scott Air Force Base.

Overall, 100 members of the wing were evaluated on their ability to use SABC techniques in a variety of situations.

Heaven forbid we’re actually put in a scenario like this. It’s crucial we understand the basic techniques to keep an individual alive until a trained medical professional can come.

Sgt. Jacob Rodriguez, 375th Communications Squadron cyber readiness 365 technician

“We’re just going through and evaluating all the different individuals from different organizations,” said Staff Sgt. Kyode Idris Jr., 375th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron scheduler. “(We’re) making sure they know how to treat the wounded.”

Medical technicians were on-hand to instruct the Airmen on SABC concepts and make corrections.

“They pretty much perform the skills to the best of their abilities,” said Senior Airman Alec Berggren, 932nd Aeromedical Staging Squadron aerospace medical technician. “We go through after and explain to them what they did wrong and what they could do better next time.”

Medical technicians were on-hand to instruct the Airmen on SABC concepts and make corrections.

The exercise players saw the importance of keeping these skills honed.

“Heaven forbid we’re actually put in a scenario like this,” said Staff Sgt. Jacob Rodriguez, 375th Communications Squadron cyber readiness 365 technician. “It’s crucial we understand the basic techniques to keep an individual alive until a trained medical professional can come.”

The evaluators agreed on the need to test these abilities.

“It’s important because you’re going to be saving a life, possibly your friend or even a stranger,” said Idris. “It’s very important to know these skills so that way you can prevent or at least decrease life threatening injuries and get them to a higher level of care.”

Airmen come with varying skills and experiences, so these exercises help bring everyone up to speed.

“There’s some people that know exactly what they need to be doing, and they’re doing it well,” said Idris. “There’s others that need a little bit more education. For the most part, people are being trained and they know how to take care of people.”

There’s some people that know exactly what they need to be doing, and they’re doing it well. There’s others that need a little bit more education. For the most part, people are being trained and they know how to take care of people.

Staff Sgt. Kyode Idris Jr., 375th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron scheduler

“This is a great exercise and great training,” said Rodriguez. “I’m glad I could be a part of it.”

  Comments