Weather News

Remnants of Tropical Storm Barry could bring rain into the metro-east

Tropical Storm Barry strengthens in Gulf of Mexico

NOAA Satellites posted a GOES EAST image of Tropical Storm Barry on the morning of July 12, 2019. The storm is expected to become a hurricane by July 13. The National Hurricane Center issued a hurricane warning for parts of the Louisiana Coast.
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NOAA Satellites posted a GOES EAST image of Tropical Storm Barry on the morning of July 12, 2019. The storm is expected to become a hurricane by July 13. The National Hurricane Center issued a hurricane warning for parts of the Louisiana Coast.

Tropical Storm Barry, which is now on shore in western Louisiana, could affect parts of the metro-east in the next few days.

The storm, which was downgraded from a Category 1 hurricane, brings an increased chance for rain into southeast Missouri and Southern Illinois, said Melissa Byrd, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service’s St. Louis Office.

Most of Sunday will be quiet, but a few storms could develop in the afternoon, the forecast indicates. This is part of Barry’s influence, which will continue to track north over the next couple of days.

Heading into Monday, the chances for rain will increase with embedded thunderstroms possible in the area, according to the forecast. Areas over southeast Missouri and Southern Illinois will remain cooler through the early portion of the week with thicker cloud cover and more persistent rain. The temperature is forecast to stay in the mid-70s to mid-80s range.

Byrd said that though it’s hard to tell now, the rain might slow down the lowering of the Mississippi River, which has finally been receding after months of devastating flooding. Because most of the rainfall is forecast for south of the metro-east, however, it shouldn’t affect the area much as far as flooding, she said.

Hana Muslic has been a public safety reporter for the Belleville News-Democrat since August 2018, covering everything from crime and courts to accidents, fires and natural disasters. She is a graduate of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s College of Journalism and her previous work can be found in The Lincoln Journal-Star and The Kansas City Star.
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