Editorials

Blue lives again come to the rescue of our lives

Two boys during the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund’s Annual Candlelight Vigil on May 13, 2015, in Washington, D.C.
Two boys during the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund’s Annual Candlelight Vigil on May 13, 2015, in Washington, D.C. AP

Sometimes we are pulled back from the brink by a slender thread, sometimes by a canvas strap.

On Friday morning two workers in Shiloh were using a concrete saw, there was a puddle and somehow the water came into contact with live current. One worker was shocked, became unconscious and stopped breathing. The second tried to pull the first to safety, but was also shocked and couldn’t rescue him.

It was fortunate that the accident was next to the Shiloh Police station. Two officers rushed over, used a canvas strap to pull the worker to safety and then used a defibrillator to revive him.

One shock almost took his life, then another revived him.

“In my opinion, if my two officers had not used the professional training they received, I don’t believe the victim would have survived until our ambulance got there,” Shiloh Police Chief Jim Stover said. “It was a challenge to get him out from where he was, but everyone worked together.”

Officer Brad Blake pulled the worker out. Officer Mark Geyer performing chest compressions to get him breathing. Blake used the defibrillator and the victim was breathing by the time the ambulance got there.

Yes, this is the second time in a week that there has been occasion to say it, but it is worth repeating: Thank you to the people who choose to risk their lives to save ours.

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