Editorials

Sgt. Brough faces the tough breaks with a tougher will

Blinded Belleville policeman Jon Brough talks about his struggles, triumphs

It's been 10 years since Jon Brough was shot in the face by a double murder suspect. He talks about coming to terms with his blindness and the fact that he will never be able to see his wife, sons and other family members again. He is determined t
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It's been 10 years since Jon Brough was shot in the face by a double murder suspect. He talks about coming to terms with his blindness and the fact that he will never be able to see his wife, sons and other family members again. He is determined t

If you haven’t yet read the profile of Belleville Police Sgt. Jon Brough, read it. If you have, you know it’s worth reading again the next time you face some adversity.

Ten years ago Brough and a tactical team were trying to arrest Larry Sicka after Sicka murdered his in-laws and was going after his estranged wife. Sicka was holed up in a little house off South First Street in Belleville and shot Brough in the face as Brough led the team through the door.

Brough was blinded in both eyes.

He went through 32 surgical procedures.

One of the procedures impaired his ability to walk.

He had every reason to crawl into a hole.

“Why did this happen to me? And what am I going to do with rest of my life? I realized then I’m never going to see my wife again. Never going to see my boys.”

He didn’t stay in that hole for long.

“If I crawl into that hole and I stay there, then that means the bad guy is going to win, and I was not and I am not going to let that bad guy win.”

Brough spent the past 10 years finding ways to win. He works to strengthen the physical capabilities he has. He honors the sacrifices of other police officers. He puts on a very successful blood drive.

A life of service that ranged from handling crashes to working against the influence of drugs in our community was transformed by his loss of sight. That change made him effusively appreciative of others’ service to him, and he continues to serve as a way of thanking others for what he’s received.

Thank you for your sacrifices, Sgt. Brough. But thank you even more for your spirit and your example.

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