Editorials

Black deaths do not matter if there is a dollar to be made

A tiny grave marker with only initials lies flat in a tire track from a logging truck at the old St. George Cemetery near Centreville.
A tiny grave marker with only initials lies flat in a tire track from a logging truck at the old St. George Cemetery near Centreville. znizami@bnd.com

When you were small you likely were taken to a cemetery by a parent where you visited the grave of someone special to your parent. You were told about the late person. You were cautioned not to step on the graves of others buried nearby.

It was a sign of respect, even though you didn’t know those people.

Well, imagine living a life filled with disrespect. You fought for your country. You fought not just for others’ freedoms, but for their actual freedom. You were treated with disrespect not for something you did nor for something you could control, but because of the color of your skin.

You die. Death makes all equal. Unless there’s a chance to make a buck.

Then even 100 years after you are dead, there again is disrespect.

What happened at the St. George Cemetery between Millstadt and Centreville is shameful. We have yet to see whether it was criminal.

But to those responsible for damaging and moving the grave markers and trampling the plots at this historic black cemetery just to get at some logs, there is this: Your parents should have taught you better.

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