Editorials

Fix fentanyl problem by putting those strippers in hazmat suits

Maybe OSHA should make strippers wear hazmat suits after a club patron overdosed on fentanyl? Five folks trying to help the man went to the hospital when they came in contact with the drug.
Maybe OSHA should make strippers wear hazmat suits after a club patron overdosed on fentanyl? Five folks trying to help the man went to the hospital when they came in contact with the drug.

One guy uses fentanyl in a strip club, six people wind up in the hospital.

Makes you think twice about jumping in to help with an overdose. Makes you appreciate those who do.

Fentanyl is a high-power synthetic opioid, intended for severe pain associated with advanced cancer. It is 50 times more potent than heroin or morphine, so drug dealers are cutting it into the heroin supply.

The U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency is seeing potency range widely, including fake oxy pills that contained 1.8 milligrams of fentanyl. Two milligrams is lethal for most people, or the equivalent of several grains of salt.

Who can you trust if not a drug dealer working in a back room with a postal scale? Or a Mexican cartel making fake oxycodone pills?

So when police, an EMT and bartenders came in contact with the fentanyl user on Friday, they landed in the hospital, too. The owners of Roxy’s Exotic Club in Brooklyn had to close and get a team in to sanitize the place.

Let that image sink in for a moment.

St. Louis doesn’t have strip clubs. Neither do Madison or Monroe counties. They are all concentrated in the poorest communities of St. Clair County, where corrupt politicians and overwhelmed police for decades have allowed them to thrive until the feds clean them up every decade or two.

We are shocked, shocked, that there are drugs being done in the clubs. Next you’ll tell us there is prostitution!

Lie down with dogs, and you’re going to catch fleas. Go in to a club to save some poor mutt, you might OD.

NIDA's Dr. Wilson Compton, one of the authors of the report about fentanyl-related overdose deaths, explains more about the of the report's findings .

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