More Videos

Driver in surveillance video damages Madison County property 0:08

Driver in surveillance video damages Madison County property

Crews battle house fire in Alorton off of Illinois 15 0:17

Crews battle house fire in Alorton off of Illinois 15

New technology is available at St. Elizabeth’s Hospital 1:57

New technology is available at St. Elizabeth’s Hospital

Hofbrauhaus to open next year 0:35

Hofbrauhaus to open next year

Illinois student talks about saving money out of state 1:46

Illinois student talks about saving money out of state

Nothing Bundt Cakes opens in Fairview Heights 0:55

Nothing Bundt Cakes opens in Fairview Heights

Fire Chief Jason Blackmon talks about morning house fire 0:54

Fire Chief Jason Blackmon talks about morning house fire

Ogbah's African Market 0:49

Ogbah's African Market

Crowd at Queen of Hearts drawing 0:25

Crowd at Queen of Hearts drawing

Eclipses were a 'time of tension' for indigenous people 1:29

Eclipses were a 'time of tension' for indigenous people

  • Katrina uproots family, now they live in Shiloh

    Shiloh resident Donna Meyers lived on the east side of New Orleans in 2005 when Katrina started to brew. Meyers’ husband, Kirkwood, a deep sea fisherman, was familiar with the way weather worked in the Gulf of Mexico. And he didn’t like what he saw. “Everybody kind of dropped their guard on that Friday and a lot of people were trapped because there was no real evacuation plan,” Meyers said. “But my husband was watching the water temperatures and the direction of the storm. He said that it wasn’t going to be good and we needed to get out of there.” Meyers and her kids, her mother, her mother-in-law and a menagerie of family pets piled into her sport utility vehicle and headed north. They drove until they got to Fairview Heights, where the family had a relative.

Katrina uproots family, now they live in Shiloh

Shiloh resident Donna Meyers lived on the east side of New Orleans in 2005 when Katrina started to brew. Meyers’ husband, Kirkwood, a deep sea fisherman, was familiar with the way weather worked in the Gulf of Mexico. And he didn’t like what he saw. “Everybody kind of dropped their guard on that Friday and a lot of people were trapped because there was no real evacuation plan,” Meyers said. “But my husband was watching the water temperatures and the direction of the storm. He said that it wasn’t going to be good and we needed to get out of there.” Meyers and her kids, her mother, her mother-in-law and a menagerie of family pets piled into her sport utility vehicle and headed north. They drove until they got to Fairview Heights, where the family had a relative.