Metro-East News

Here’s how much public employees in Clinton County, others are paid

What do public employees make compared to you?

Each year the salaries of public employees such as teachers, police and politicians in southwestern Illinois are collected into a searchable database at BND.com/publicpay. Here is how much in taxes it takes to pay government workers, and how their
Up Next
Each year the salaries of public employees such as teachers, police and politicians in southwestern Illinois are collected into a searchable database at BND.com/publicpay. Here is how much in taxes it takes to pay government workers, and how their

The total money spent on salaries for four metro-east counties was about $21.8 million, according to public records.

About 650 records for Bond, Clinton, Monroe and Randolph counties have been added to the News-Democrat’s Public Pay Database, which can be found at bnd.com/publicpay.

The averages for each county included:

▪  Bond County: 189 people made $4.3 million and had a median salary of about $16,200 due in part to many part-time workers

▪  Clinton County: 177 people made $6.3 million and had a median salary of about $37,800

▪  Monroe County: 157 people made $5.9 million and had a median salary of about $42,500

▪  Randolph County: 129 people made $5.6 million and had a median salary of about $48,200

The highest paid people in each county included:

▪  Bond County: Chris Bauer, state’s attorney, $123,990.00

▪  Bond County: Dora Mann, assistant state’s attorney, $92,872.20

▪  Clinton County: John Hudspeth, state’s attorney, $166,507.90

▪  Clinton County: Stewart Freeman, public defender, $149,854.12

▪  Monroe County: Aaron Metzger, highway department, $102,853.82

▪  Monroe County: Christopher Hitzemann, state’s attorney office, $96,062.29

▪  Randolph County: Jeremy Walker, state’s attorney, $186,472.21

▪  Randolph County: Michael Riebeling, engineer, $108,091.57

The BND database contains more than 140,000 public salary records since 2011. The data is gathered through Freedom of Information Act requests.

The database gives basic compensation information and does not typically include retirement or insurance benefits, though some records may. In addition, some government bodies operate on a fiscal year, while others operate on a calendar year, so comparisons are not always the same for the exact same time period.

Also, someone’s total pay may be more than their base pay. Some teachers, for example, make extra money by coaching sports teams. And, not everyone’s salaries may be paid by that unit. Some people may be paid through grants or state or federal government.

More schools, cities, townships, villages and other layers of government in the metro-east will be added periodically.

Casey Bischel: 618-239-2655, @CaseyBischel

  Comments