Politics & Government

Greenwood potentially getting familiar challenger in 2020

Illinois Governor Rauner asking state candidates to sign pledge

During the 2018 campaign, including at a stop in Belleville, former Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner asked candidates for state office to pledge to put term limits on the ballot and to vote for someone besides Mike Madigan for speaker of the house.
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During the 2018 campaign, including at a stop in Belleville, former Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner asked candidates for state office to pledge to put term limits on the ballot and to vote for someone besides Mike Madigan for speaker of the house.

A Centreville Republican who ran for state representative in 2018 is getting set to make another run for the seat in the General Assembly.

Jason Madlock, 32, challenged state Rep. LaToya Greenwood, D-East St. Louis, in last year’s election in the 114th District. Greenwood won re-election by more than 6,100 votes.

Over the weekend Madlock launched his campaign Facebook page and was asking people to help collect signatures in the district that includes East St. Louis, Alorton, Centreville, Millstadt, Smithton, Freeburg, Shiloh, O’Fallon and Scott Air Force Base.

Madlock was asking for volunteers to help gather signatures in the district in order to make the ballot.

Candidates from established parties may begin circulating petitions to run for office on Sept. 3. Democrats and Republicans running for state representative need to collect between 500 and 1,500 signatures from registered voters in their district.

Official filing of petitions for the 2020 election is scheduled from Nov. 25 through Dec. 2.

Madlock said GOP views of being pro-second amendment rights and anti-abortion make him a Republican.

“I’m a Republican by nature, but I also see where the Democrats come from,” Madlock said. “I see where all the people come from. I am a Republican, but I have views on both sides.”

During the 2018 campaign, Madlock had an issue with filing timely quarterly campaign finance reports when he had a campaign committee. He nearly was kicked off the ballot, but paid a fine to state Board of Elections to remain.

Ultimately he decided to shut down the committee and not raise money for his campaign.

Whether Madlock sticks with the same plan for this election cycle is still being determined, he said.

“Money helps out a lot, (but) I look at how far we got without any money, which I think we did pretty good last time,” he said.

During last year’s campaign, Madlock participated in an event in Belleville with then Gov. Bruce Rauner where they signed the “People’s Pledge.” It called for candidates for state office to pledge to put term limits on the ballot and to vote for someone besides Mike Madigan for speaker of the house.

Madlock said he won’t take a public stance on the proposal to allow for a progressive income tax in the state, which will probably become the central election issue discussed in Illinois until November of next year.

“Where I stand personally, I don’t think is important,” Madlock said. “I am going to stand wherever my people want me to stand on it. Essentially, I’m not going to be in office to make decisions based on what I want to do. My job is to represent the people. If the progressive income tax is something the people want, then that’s what I’m for. If people are against it, I’m going to be against it.”

The primary election is scheduled for March 17, 2020, with the general election on Nov. 3, 2020.

BEHIND OUR REPORTING

Why did we do this story?

The November 2020 election may be more than a year away, but candidates are starting to organize and begin the process to appear on the ballot. On Sept. 3, candidates were allowed to begin collecting signatures on petitions that are required to appear on the March 17 primary ballot. Official filing of petitions is scheduled from Nov. 25 through Dec. 2. The BND will cover the important steps leading up to the election as part of our role in giving you information that will help you participate in civic life and be a watchdog of the candidates and the election process.

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